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    Risk assessment of coumarin using the bench mark dose (BMD) approach: children in Norway which regularly eat oatmeal porridge with cinnamon may exceed the TDI for coumarin with several folds.

    Authors
    Fotland TØ, Paulsen JE, Sanner T, et al. 
    Institution

    Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway.

    Source
    Food Chem Toxicol 2012 Mar; 50(3-4) :903-12.
    Abstract

    Coumarin is a naturally occurring flavouring substance in cinnamon and many other plants. It is known that coumarin can cause liver toxicity in several species, and it is considered a non-genotoxic carcinogen in rodents. By using the bench mark dose approach we re-assessed coumarin toxicity and established a new TDI for coumarin of 0.07 mg/kg bw/day. Oral intake of coumarin is related to consumption of cinnamon-containing foods and food supplements. Cinnamon is a widely used spice in Norway, and can be used as topping on oatmeal porridge. Based on analyses of coumarin in Norwegian foods, intake calculations for children and adults were conducted, and a risk assessment of coumarin in the Norwegian population was performed. Intake estimates of coumarin show that small children eating oatmeal porridge several times a week sprinkled with cinnamon could have a coumarin intake of 1.63 mg/kg bw/day and may exceeding the TDI with several folds. Adults drinking cinnamon-based tea and consuming cinnamon supplements also can exceed TDI. The coumarin intake could exceed the TDI by 7- to 20-fold in some intake scenarios. Such large daily exceedances of TDI, even for a limited time period of 1-2 weeks, cause concern of adverse health effects.

    Mesh
    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Avena sativa
    Child
    Cinnamomum zeylanicum
    Coumarins
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Environmental Exposure
    Female
    Humans
    Infant
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Norway
    Risk Assessment
    Young Adult
    Language

    eng

    Pub Type(s)
    Journal Article
    PubMed ID

    22178604

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