MEDLINE Journals

    Ethical issues for hospice volunteers.

    Authors

    Berry P, Planalp S 

    Institution

    College of Nursing, University of Utah, 10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. patricia.berry@nurs.utah.edu

    Source

    Am J Hosp Palliat Care 2008 Dec-2009 Jan; 25(6) :458-62.

    Abstract

    Health care professionals usually receive professional education in ethics, but the half million hospice volunteers in the United States may receive only brief training that is limited to confidentiality and the volunteer role. The purpose of this study was to explore ethical issues hospice volunteers confront in their work. Interviews with 39 hospice volunteers were conducted, audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. Prominent themes were dilemmas about gifts, patient care and family concerns, issues related to volunteer roles and boundaries, and issues surrounding suicide and hastening death. Suggestions for training include discussions of ethics after initial training once volunteers had confronted ethical issues, with special emphasis on strategies for negotiating their uneasy role positioned between health care professional and friend.

    Mesh

    Attitude of Health Personnel
    Confidentiality
    Conflict (Psychology)
    Dissent and Disputes
    Family
    Female
    Gift Giving
    Hospice Care
    Humans
    Inservice Training
    Interprofessional Relations
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Patient Advocacy
    Practice Guidelines as Topic
    Professional Role
    Qualitative Research
    Questionnaires
    Southwestern United States
    Suicide, Assisted
    Voluntary Workers

    Language

    eng

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    PubMed ID

    19106279

    Content Manager
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