MEDLINE Journals

    Comparison of chlorpromazine, haloperidol and pimozide in the treatment of phencyclidine psychosis: DA-2 receptor specificity.

    Authors

    Giannini AJ, Nageotte C, Loiselle RH, et al. 

    Source

    J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1984-1985; 22(6) :573-9.

    Abstract

    Three neuroleptics were used to treat phencyclidine (PCP) psychosis. These included chlorpromazine, a DA-1 and DA-2 dopamine antagonist with noradrenergic effects; haloperidol, a predominantly DA-2 antagonist with noradrenergic effects; and pimozide a predominantly DA-2 antagonist with no noradrenergic activity. Three cohorts of randomly selected young white adult males were studied. Responses to haloperidol and pimozide were statistically equivalent and both were significantly superior to chlorpromazine. These results further support the role of the DA-2 receptor in PCP psychosis and tend to rule out a noradrenergic role. The authors therefore suggest that DA-2 blockers, such as haloperidol or pimozide be employed as treatment of choice in PCP psychosis.

    Mesh

    Adult
    Chlorpromazine
    Haloperidol
    Humans
    Male
    Phencyclidine
    Pimozide
    Psychoses, Substance-Induced
    Receptors, Dopamine

    Language

    eng

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial Comparative Study Controlled Clinical Trial Journal Article

    PubMed ID

    6535849

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