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Bacteriology of the sinus cavities of asymptomatic individuals after endoscopic sinus surgery.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE
To determine the resident flora and the level of bacterial presence of the healthy sinus cavity post-endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS).
SETTING
University-based prospective trial.
METHOD
Subjects included asymptomatic patients who had undergone ESS for inflammatory disease more than 12 weeks previously. Endoscopic cultures of the sinus cavities were performed with swab and a novel lavage technique and were processed for identification of bacterial species and the level of bacterial presence.
RESULTS
Thirty-two patients were recruited. Bacterial organisms were recovered in 97% of subjects (mean 1.5 organisms/patient). The flora predominantly consisted of coagulase-negative staphylococci (69%) and diphtheroids (25%). Staphylococcus aureus was recovered in 31% of subjects and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 3% only. No gram-negative rods were recovered in any individual. The Gram stains of 29 individuals were identified; 20 (69%) had no white blood cells, 9 (31%) had 1+ white blood cells, and none had >1 white blood cells. All quantitative lavage fluid cultures were negative at the 10(4) detection level.
CONCLUSION
Coagulase-negative staphylococci, diphtheroids, and S. aureus constitute the predominant flora of the healthy post-ESS sinus cavity and probably represent colonization of the cavity by nasal flora from the contiguous nasal mucosa. These data offer a basis for interpreting sinus cultures obtained in symptomatic patients after ESS. S. aureus may be frequently recovered in asymptomatic patients; thus, not all instances of S. aureus recovery on culture require therapy. Future testing of individuals with this organism will probably have to be modified to better assess factors associated with pathogenicity, such as bacterial load, biofilm formation, or superantigen production. In contrast, gram-negative rods and P. aeruginosa should probably be treated when identified on culture.

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  • Authors

    Al-Shemari H, Abou-Hamad W, Libman M, Desrosiers M

    Institution

    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, McGill University, and Montreal General Hospital, Quebec, Canada.

    Source

    The Journal of otolaryngology 36:1 2007 Feb pg 43-8

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Endoscopy
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Nasal Mucosa
    Paranasal Sinuses
    Postoperative Period
    Prospective Studies
    Sinusitis
    Staphylococcus aureus

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17376350