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Cannabidiol decreases bone resorption by inhibiting RANK/RANKL expression and pro-inflammatory cytokines during experimental periodontitis in rats.

Abstract

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a cannabinoid component from Cannabis sativa that does not induce psychotomimetic effects and possess anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study we tested the effects of CBD in a periodontitis experimental model in rats. We also investigated possible mechanisms underlying these effects. Periodontal disease was induced by a ligature placed around the mandible first molars of each animal. Male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: control animals; ligature-induced animals treated with vehicle and ligature-induced animals treated with CBD (5 mg/kg, daily). Thirty days after the induction of periodontal disease the animals were sacrificed and mandibles and gingival tissues removed for further analysis. Morphometrical analysis of alveolar bone loss demonstrated that CBD-treated animals presented a decreased alveolar bone loss and a lower expression of the activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand RANKL/RANK. Moreover, gingival tissues from the CBD-treated group showed decreased neutrophil migration (MPO assay) associated with lower interleukin (IL)-1beta and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production. These results indicate that CBD may be useful to control bone resorption during progression of experimental periodontitis in rats.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors

    Napimoga MH, Benatti BB, Lima FO, Alves PM, Campos AC, Pena-Dos-Santos DR, Severino FP, Cunha FQ, Guimarães FS

    Source

    International immunopharmacology 9:2 2009 Feb pg 216-22

    MeSH

    Animals
    Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
    Bone Resorption
    Cannabidiol
    Cell Movement
    Cytokines
    Disease Models, Animal
    Male
    Neutrophils
    Periodontitis
    Peroxidase
    RANK Ligand
    Rats
    Rats, Wistar
    Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-kappa B

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19070683