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Increased serum phosphate levels and calcium fluxes are seen in smaller individuals after a single dose of sodium phosphate colon cleansing solution: a pharmacokinetic analysis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Sodium phosphate containing colonoscopy preparations may cause electrolyte disturbances and calcium-phosphate nephropathy. Decreased body weight is an unexplored risk factor for complications with sodium phosphate ingestion.
AIM
To perform a pharmacokinetic analysis of a single dose of Fleet Phospho-Soda in smaller and larger individuals.
METHODS
Seven subjects weighing <55 kg (Group I) and six weighing >100 kg (Group II) consumed 45 mL Fleet Phospho-Soda. Serum electrolytes were measured. Hydration was closely maintained by monitoring weight, fluid intake and total body water.
RESULTS
Marked increases in serum phosphate were seen in Group I compared to Group II. For example, mean serum phosphate at 120 min was 7.8 +/- 0.5 mg/dL in Group I and 5.1 +/- 0.8 mg/dL in Group II (P < 0.001). Normalized area under the phosphate vs. time curve for Group I was 1120 +/- 190 mg/dL*min and 685 +/- 136 mg/dL*min for Group II (P < 0.001). Twelve-hour urine calcium was lower in Group I (16.4 +/- 7.6 mg) than in Group II (39.2 +/- 7.8 mg, P < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS
Increased serum phosphate occurs in smaller individuals after ingestion of sodium phosphate preparations, even with strict attention to fluid intake. Smaller body weight poses a potential risk for calcium-phosphate nephropathy.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors

    Ehrenpreis ED

    Institution

    Department of Gastroenterology, Highland Park Hospital, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Highland Park, IL 60035, USA. ehrenpreis@gipharm.net

    Source

    Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics 29:11 2009 Jun 1 pg 1202-11

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Composition
    Calcium Phosphates
    Cathartics
    Colonoscopy
    Electrolytes
    Female
    Humans
    Hyperphosphatemia
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Phosphates
    Risk Factors
    Therapeutic Irrigation
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19298584