Prime

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Opposite relationships between cannabis use and neurocognitive functioning in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cannabis use is associated with altered neurocognitive functioning in severe mental disorders, but data are still inconclusive and there are no studies of bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between cannabis use and neurocognition in bipolar disorder compared with schizophrenia in a naturalistic setting.

METHOD

A total of 133 patients with bipolar disorder and 140 patients with schizophrenia underwent neuropsychological assessments and clinical characterization including measures of substance use. Relationships between cannabis users and neurocognitive function were explored in the two diagnostic groups. Possible interactions between diagnosis and cannabis use were investigated, and findings were controlled for possible confounders.

RESULTS

In bipolar disorder subjects, cannabis use was associated with better neurocognitive function, but the opposite was the case for the schizophrenia subjects. There was a statistically significant interaction effect of diagnosis and cannabis use on focused attention (p=0.019), executive functioning (verbal fluency--set shifting) (p=0.009), logical memory-learning (p=0.007) and on logical memory-recall (p=0.004). These differences in neurocognitive function could not be explained by putative confounders.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings suggest that cannabis use may be related to improved neurocognition in bipolar disorder and compromised neurocognition in schizophrenia. The results need to be replicated in independent samples, and may suggest different underlying disease mechanisms in the two disorders.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors

    Ringen PA, Vaskinn A, Sundet K, Engh JA, Jónsdóttir H, Simonsen C, Friis S, Opjordsmoen S, Melle I, Andreassen OA

    Source

    Psychological medicine 40:8 2010 Aug pg 1337-47

    MeSH

    Adult
    Attention
    Bipolar Disorder
    Cognition Disorders
    Executive Function
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Marijuana Abuse
    Memory, Short-Term
    Middle Aged
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Psychometrics
    Psychomotor Performance
    Psychotic Disorders
    Schizophrenia
    Schizophrenic Psychology
    Verbal Learning
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19891810