Unbound MEDLINE

Neurolupus.

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is not an uncommon condition. Most neurologists are well aware that it can cause a wide range of neurological complications, and SLE almost invariably appears on 'differential diagnosis' lists in cases of clinical uncertainty. However, the precise nature of the manifestations of SLE in the central and peripheral nervous systems is perhaps less widely understood, and misperceptions about phenomenology and treatment are common. Here we survey some of the main primary neurological complications of SLE--'neurolupus'--while acknowledging that secondary problems, either iatrogenic or relating to other consequences of SLE (eg, hypertensive CNS disease, for example, secondary to renal lupus) are neither less serious nor less treatable.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors

    Joseph FG, Scolding NJ

    Institution

    Consultant Neurologist, Neville Hall Hospital, Abergavenny and the Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, UK.

    Source

    Practical neurology 10:1 2010 Feb pg 4-15

    MeSH

    Diagnosis, Differential
    Humans
    Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic
    Nervous System Diseases
    Severity of Illness Index

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20130291