Unbound MEDLINE

Glutathione-S-transferase subtypes α and π as a tool to predict and monitor graft failure or regeneration in a pilot study of living donor liver transplantation.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE
Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) subtype α and π are differentially expressed in adult liver tissue. Objective of the study was if GST α and π may serve as predictive markers for liver surgery, especially transplantations.
METHODS
13 patients receiving living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and their corresponding donors were analyzed for standard serum parameters (ALT, AST, γGT, bilirubin) as well as GST-α and -π before LDLT and daily for 10 days after LDLT. Patients (R) and donors (D) were grouped according to graft loss (R1/D1) or positive outcome (R2/D2) and above named serum parameters were compared between the groups.
RESULTS
R1 showed significantly increased GST-α and significantly lower GST-π levels than R2 patients or the donors. There was a positive correlation between GST-α and ALT, AST as well as bilirubin and a negative correlation to γGT. However, γGT correlated positively with GST-π. Graft failure was associated with combined low GST-π levels in donors and their recipients before living donor liver transplantation.
CONCLUSION
Our data suggest that high GST-α serum levels reflect ongoing liver damage while GST-π indicates the capacity and process of liver regeneration. Additionally, GST-π may be useful as marker for optimizing donor and recipient pairs in living donor liver transplantation.

Authors

Jochum C, Beste M, Sowa JP, Farahani MS, Penndorf V, Nadalin S, Saner F, Canbay A, Gerken G

Institution

Clinic of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen, Germany.

Source

European journal of medical research 16:1 2011 Jan 27 pg 34-40

MeSH

Adult
Aged
Biological Markers
Female
Glutathione S-Transferase pi
Glutathione Transferase
Graft Survival
Humans
Isoenzymes
Liver
Liver Function Tests
Liver Regeneration
Liver Transplantation
Living Donors
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Predictive Value of Tests
Prognosis
Young Adult

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21345768