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Location of the abducent nerve within the cavernous sinus.

Abstract

AIM
Knowing the distance between the superior and inferior border of Parkinson's triangle and the location of the abducent nerve within the cavernous sinus is important to decrease the complications which may occur during surgery. We aimed to investigate the cavernous sinus to decrease the complications that may occur during surgery to this area. MATERIAL and
METHODS
Fifty MRIs without pituitary gland abnormality were chosen for radiological assessment of CS. These images were from 18 males and 32 females, with ages ranging from 9 to 58 years and a median age of 28 years. We evaluated structures within and on the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus (especially Parkinson's triangle) with magnetic resonance imaging. The position of the abducent nerve and its level according to the cranial nerves running close the lateral wall were examined.
RESULTS
At the level of pituitary stalk, the distance between the trochlear nerve and the ophthalmic nerve ranged from 1 to 4 mm bilaterally. The abducent nerve was located between the trochlear and the ophthalmic nerves in 30% cases bilaterally.
CONCLUSION
The knowledge of the position of the abducent nerve will provide a great benefit in minimizing the rate of complications that may occur during the resection of tumors of the cavernous sinus.

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  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors

    Kirici Y, Kilic C, Kocaoglu M

    Source

    Turkish neurosurgery 21:4 2011 pg 545-8

    MeSH

    Abducens Nerve
    Adolescent
    Adult
    Carotid Artery, Internal
    Cavernous Sinus
    Cerebrovascular Circulation
    Child
    Cranial Fossa, Middle
    Female
    Functional Laterality
    Genetic Variation
    Humans
    Imaging, Three-Dimensional
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Neuronavigation
    Ophthalmic Nerve
    Pituitary Gland
    Retrospective Studies
    Sella Turcica
    Sphenoid Sinus
    Trochlear Nerve
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22194114