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The gender asymmetric effect of intimate partner violence on relationship satisfaction.

Abstract

Our research examined the association between intimate partner violence and relationship satisfaction among victims. The negative association between victimization and relationship satisfaction was substantially stronger for females than for males. Comparisons between respondents reporting about same-sex relationships with those reporting about opposite-sex relationships provided evidence that the amplified victimization/satisfaction association among female victims is a victim-gender effect rather than an actor-gender effect. In other words, our findings suggest that aggression harms the quality of the intimate partnerships of females much more so than the partnerships of males regardless of whether a male or a female is the perpetrator. We supplemented dialogue about the direct implications of our findings with discussions about how these results may raise conceptual questions about the adequacy of the instruments scholars use to study partner aggression.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors

    Ackerman J, Field L

    Institution

    Department of Sociology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. jma2@tamu.edu

    Source

    Violence and victims 26:6 2011 pg 703-24

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aggression
    Attitude to Health
    Courtship
    Crime Victims
    Female
    Humans
    Interpersonal Relations
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Personal Satisfaction
    Questionnaires
    Sex Factors
    Spouse Abuse
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22288091