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Lack of interactions between fire ant control products and white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in turfgrass.

Abstract

Insecticides are widely used to manage turfgrass pest such as white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta (Buren) are important predators and pests in managed turfgrass. We tested the susceptibility of white grub life stages (adults, egg, and larvae) to predation by S. invicta and determined if insecticides applied for control of S. invicta would result in locally greater white grub populations. Field trials over 2 yr evaluated bifenthrin, fipronil, and hydramethylnon applied to large and small scale turfgrass plots for impacts on fire ant foraging and white grub populations. Coincident with these trials, adults, larvae, and eggs of common scarab species were evaluated for susceptibility to predation by S. invicta under field conditions. Field trials with insecticides failed to show a significant increase in white grub populations resulting from treatment of turfgrass for fire ants. This, in part, may be because of a lack of predation of S. invicta on adult and larval scarabs. Egg predation was greatest at 70% but < 20% of adults and larvae were attacked in a 24 h test. Contrary to other studies, results presented here suggest that fire ants and fire ant control products applied to turfgrass have a minimal impact on white grub populations.

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  • Authors

    Barden SA, Held DW, Graham LC

    Institution

    Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology, 301 Funchess Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA.

    Source

    Journal of economic entomology 104:6 2011 Dec pg 2009-16

    MeSH

    Alabama
    Animals
    Ants
    Beetles
    Cynodon
    Female
    Insecticides
    Larva
    Male
    Ovum
    Population Density
    Predatory Behavior
    Pyrazoles
    Pyrethrins
    Pyrimidinones
    Seasons
    Species Specificity

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22299364