Unbound MEDLINE

Shear bond strengths of a selenium containing and a conventional light cured adhesive for orthodontic bonding.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the debonding strength and mode of failure of a selenium containing adhesive compared to an established orthodontic adhesive.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
One hundred sixty bovine mandibular incisors were allocated to eight groups: steel and clear brackets were bonded with either selenium containing adhesive (Group 1: SeLect Defense) or a conventional light-cured adhesive (Group 2:Transbond XT) to measure debond strength and the adhesive remnant index was used to assess the location of bond failure. Data was evaluated using a three-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD multiple comparisons test for mean debond strengths.
RESULTS
Group 2 debond strengths were greater than that of Group 1 with the steel and clear brackets. Group 1 debond strengths were greater with clear than with steel brackets at both time points. Both adhesives demonstrated increased debond strengths from zero to 24 hours and the clear brackets exhibited a greater ARI than steel after debonding. Comparisons of debond strength means among adhesives, brackets, and times were all statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS/DISCUSSION
All debond strengths were within a clinically acceptable range according to previous literature. SeLect Defense may be desirable due to its potential for preventing white spot lesions despite the reduced strength compared to Transbond XT.

Authors

Machicek SL, McGrory KR, English JD, Stephens CR, Ellis RK, Colville CD, Powers JM, Ontiveros JC, Akyalcin S

Source

Texas dental journal 128:12 2011 Dec pg 1261-7

MeSH

Adhesiveness
Aluminum Oxide
Animals
Cattle
Dental Alloys
Dental Bonding
Dental Cements
Dental Debonding
Dental Enamel
Dental Stress Analysis
Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives
Orthodontic Brackets
Random Allocation
Resin Cements
Selenium
Shear Strength
Stainless Steel
Stress, Mechanical
Surface Properties
Time Factors

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22375444