Unbound MEDLINE

Pseudo-sudden deafness.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES
We describe the symptom complex and management of a clinical entity we refer to as "pseudo-sudden deafness," which is an episode of acute otitis media that leads to sensorineural hearing loss with reduced speech discrimination.
METHODS
We included 8 adult patients with audiometrically confirmed, asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss with decreased speech discrimination that presented after an episode of acute otitis media. Magnetic resonance imaging ruled out retrocochlear disease. Both physical examination and myringotomy helped confirm the diagnosis of serous otitis media (SOM). Myringotomy, tympanostomy tubes, oral antibiotics, and otic antibiotic-steroid drops were used to treat the SOM. Oral steroids were used to treat the sensorineural component.
RESULTS
Pretreatment and posttreatment audiograms showed an improvement in speech discrimination score, pure tone thresholds, or both after treatment for underlying SOM and sensorineural hearing loss in 6 of the 8 patients.
CONCLUSIONS
Patients who present with an acute onset of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with decreased speech discrimination may be mistakenly thought to have idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss when, in fact, they may have an SOM-induced phenomenon that is potentially reversible. The distinguishing feature is a preexisting otitis media, which must be treated first, before the administration of steroids.

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  • Authors

    Song JE, Sapthavee A, Cager GR, Saadia-Redleaf MI

    Source

    The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology 121:2 2012 Feb pg 96-9

    MeSH

    Acute Disease
    Adolescent
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Anti-Bacterial Agents
    Audiometry, Pure-Tone
    Female
    Glucocorticoids
    Hearing Loss, Sensorineural
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Middle Ear Ventilation
    Otitis Media with Effusion
    Respiratory Tract Infections
    Speech Discrimination Tests
    Tinnitus
    Vertigo

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22397217