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Hepatitis C virus infection can affect lymphoproliferative disorders only as a cofactor for Epstein-Barr virus in liver transplant recipients: PTLD.Int survey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES
Hepatitis C virus infection has a 10.5% frequency in liver transplant posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders. Studies have suggested that hepatitis C virus infection plays a role in developing posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders. Pooling data of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders developing in liver recipients from the literature, we analyzed and compared characteristics, behavior, and prognoses of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders arising in hepatitis C virus-positive versus negative liver graft recipients.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
We conducted a search for the available data though PubMed and Google Scholar for reports of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders and hepatitis C virus infection in liver transplant recipients. Overall, 29 studies were found and their data are included in the analyses.
RESULTS
Overall, data of 212 liver transplant patients were included. Sixty-three percent were male. No difference was found between hepatitis C virus-positive liver transplant patients with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders compared to their hepatitis C virus-negative counterparts regarding sex, time from transplant to lymphoma development, lymphoma cell type, remission, mortality rate, multiorgan involvement, disseminated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders, and histopathologic evaluations (P > .1 for all). Hepatitis C virus-positive liver transplant recipients representing posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders who were concomitantly positive for Epstein-Barr virus were significantly more likely to develop lymphomas in the early posttransplant period (26 [67%] vs 16 [40%]; P = .024) and to complicate liver (19 [63%] vs 8 [30%]; P = .017) than hepatitis C virus-/Epstein-Barr virus+ patients.
CONCLUSIONS
Hepatitis C virus infection alone has no significant effect on lymphoproliferative disorders after liver transplant; but when combined with Epstein-Barr virus infection, it represents some significant different presentations of the disease. However, no survival effect was found for hepatitis C virus with or without simultaneous Epstein-Barr virus infection, in the posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders setting. Future prospective studies are needed for confirming our results.

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  • Authors

    Khedmat H, Taheri S

    Source

    Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation 10:2 2012 Apr pg 141-7

    MeSH

    Adult
    Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
    Female
    Health Surveys
    Hepatitis C, Chronic
    Humans
    Liver Transplantation
    Lymphoproliferative Disorders
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Postoperative Complications
    Prognosis
    Risk Factors
    Survival Analysis

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22432758