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Relationship between dietary patterns and serum uric acid concentrations among ethnic Chinese adults in Taiwan.

Abstract

The evidence for a relationship between dietary patterns and uric acid concentrations is scanty. Here, we used a validated food frequency questionnaire for an ethnic Chinese population in Taiwan to investigate the relationship between dietary patterns and uric acid concentrations. A cross-sectional study on 266 adults, who were interviewed with a 38-item food frequency questionnaire, was conducted and serum uric acid levels were measured. Three dietary patterns were derived from the questionnaire by exploratory factor analysis. Participants in the higher vegetable and fruit pattern quartiles were more likely to have a lower uric acid concentration (6.5 for the first, 5.7 for the second, 6.0 for the third, and 6.0 mg/dL for the fourth quartile, p = 0.030). For uric acid-prone patterns, as the quartiles increased, the adjusted mean uric acid concentrations increased significantly (5.88, 5.93, 5.99 and 6.38 mg/dL for each quartile, respectively, p = 0.04). However, the significance level was attenuated after adjusting for additional confounding factors. In conclusion, three dietary patterns were identified for ethnic Chinese in Taiwan, and the relationship between these dietary patterns and uric acid was not significant after adjustment.

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  • Authors

    Tsai YT, Liu JP, Tu YK, Lee MS, Chen PR, Hsu HC, Chen MF, Chien KL

    Institution

    Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public School, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

    Source

    Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition 21:2 2012 pg 263-70

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Asian Continental Ancestry Group
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet
    Discriminant Analysis
    Factor Analysis, Statistical
    Female
    Fruit
    Humans
    Hyperuricemia
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Questionnaires
    Taiwan
    Uric Acid
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22507614