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Age at first drink and risk for alcoholism: a noncausal association.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1999 Jan; 23(1):101-7.AC

Abstract

Prior research indicates risk for alcoholism is increased among individuals who begin to drink at an early age. We replicate and extend these findings, addressing causal and noncausal explanations for this association. Structured psychiatric interviews, including assessment of lifetime DSM-IV alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence (AD), were conducted with 8746 adult twins ascertained through a population-based twin registry. We found strong evidence for an association between early drinking onset and risk for AD, but less evidence for an association with alcohol abuse. The results of twin-pair analyses suggest that all of the association between early drinking and later AD is due to familial sources, which probably reflect both shared environmental and genetic factors. These results suggest the association between drinking onset and diagnosis is noncausal, and attempts to prevent the development of AD by delaying drinking onset are unlikely to be successful.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Medical College of Virginia of Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond 23298-0126, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10029209

Citation

Prescott, C A., and K S. Kendler. "Age at First Drink and Risk for Alcoholism: a Noncausal Association." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 23, no. 1, 1999, pp. 101-7.
Prescott CA, Kendler KS. Age at first drink and risk for alcoholism: a noncausal association. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1999;23(1):101-7.
Prescott, C. A., & Kendler, K. S. (1999). Age at first drink and risk for alcoholism: a noncausal association. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 23(1), 101-7.
Prescott CA, Kendler KS. Age at First Drink and Risk for Alcoholism: a Noncausal Association. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1999;23(1):101-7. PubMed PMID: 10029209.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age at first drink and risk for alcoholism: a noncausal association. AU - Prescott,C A, AU - Kendler,K S, PY - 1999/2/24/pubmed PY - 1999/2/24/medline PY - 1999/2/24/entrez SP - 101 EP - 7 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - Prior research indicates risk for alcoholism is increased among individuals who begin to drink at an early age. We replicate and extend these findings, addressing causal and noncausal explanations for this association. Structured psychiatric interviews, including assessment of lifetime DSM-IV alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence (AD), were conducted with 8746 adult twins ascertained through a population-based twin registry. We found strong evidence for an association between early drinking onset and risk for AD, but less evidence for an association with alcohol abuse. The results of twin-pair analyses suggest that all of the association between early drinking and later AD is due to familial sources, which probably reflect both shared environmental and genetic factors. These results suggest the association between drinking onset and diagnosis is noncausal, and attempts to prevent the development of AD by delaying drinking onset are unlikely to be successful. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10029209/Age_at_first_drink_and_risk_for_alcoholism:_a_noncausal_association_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=1999&volume=23&issue=1&spage=101 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -