Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma: etiological similarities and differences.

Abstract

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) of the skin and cutaneous malignant melanoma can now be compared epidemiologically through the use of population-based data not previously available for MCC. The results may provide new clues to etiology. In this study, United States data covered by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program were from nine areas of the United States (approximately 10% of the population). In 1986-1994, 425 cases of MCC were registered. The annual age-adjusted incidence per 100,000 of MCC was 0.23 for whites and 0.01 for blacks; among whites, the ratio of melanoma to MCC was approximately 65 to 1. Only 5% of MCC occurred before age 50, unlike the lifelong risk of nodular and superficial spreading melanoma. Regional incidence rates of both cancers increased similarly with increasing sun exposure as measured by the UVB solar index. The most sun-exposed anatomical site, the face, was the location of 36% of MCC but only 14% of melanoma. Both cancers increased in frequency and aggressiveness after immunosuppression and organ transplantation (36 cases from the Cincinnati Transplant Tumor registry and 12 from published case reports) and after B-cell neoplasia (5 cases in this study; 13 from case series in the literature). The SEER data contained reports of six patients with both types of cancer; 5 melanomas before the diagnosis of MCC and 1 after diagnosis. MCC and melanoma are similarly related to sun exposure and immunosuppression, but they differ markedly from one another in their distributions by age, race, and anatomical site, especially the face.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Genetic Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7360, USA. millerr@epndce.nci.nih.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10067813

Citation

Miller, R W., and C S. Rabkin. "Merkel Cell Carcinoma and Melanoma: Etiological Similarities and Differences." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 8, no. 2, 1999, pp. 153-8.
Miller RW, Rabkin CS. Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma: etiological similarities and differences. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(2):153-8.
Miller, R. W., & Rabkin, C. S. (1999). Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma: etiological similarities and differences. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 8(2), pp. 153-8.
Miller RW, Rabkin CS. Merkel Cell Carcinoma and Melanoma: Etiological Similarities and Differences. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(2):153-8. PubMed PMID: 10067813.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma: etiological similarities and differences. AU - Miller,R W, AU - Rabkin,C S, PY - 1999/3/6/pubmed PY - 1999/3/6/medline PY - 1999/3/6/entrez SP - 153 EP - 8 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) of the skin and cutaneous malignant melanoma can now be compared epidemiologically through the use of population-based data not previously available for MCC. The results may provide new clues to etiology. In this study, United States data covered by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program were from nine areas of the United States (approximately 10% of the population). In 1986-1994, 425 cases of MCC were registered. The annual age-adjusted incidence per 100,000 of MCC was 0.23 for whites and 0.01 for blacks; among whites, the ratio of melanoma to MCC was approximately 65 to 1. Only 5% of MCC occurred before age 50, unlike the lifelong risk of nodular and superficial spreading melanoma. Regional incidence rates of both cancers increased similarly with increasing sun exposure as measured by the UVB solar index. The most sun-exposed anatomical site, the face, was the location of 36% of MCC but only 14% of melanoma. Both cancers increased in frequency and aggressiveness after immunosuppression and organ transplantation (36 cases from the Cincinnati Transplant Tumor registry and 12 from published case reports) and after B-cell neoplasia (5 cases in this study; 13 from case series in the literature). The SEER data contained reports of six patients with both types of cancer; 5 melanomas before the diagnosis of MCC and 1 after diagnosis. MCC and melanoma are similarly related to sun exposure and immunosuppression, but they differ markedly from one another in their distributions by age, race, and anatomical site, especially the face. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10067813/Merkel_cell_carcinoma_and_melanoma:_etiological_similarities_and_differences_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10067813 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -