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Liver disease in pregnancy.
Am Fam Physician. 1999 Feb 15; 59(4):829-36.AF

Abstract

Acute viral hepatitis is the most common cause of jaundice in pregnancy. The course of acute hepatitis is unaffected by pregnancy, except in patients with hepatitis E and disseminated herpes simplex infections, in which maternal and fetal mortality rates are significantly increased. Chronic hepatitis B or C infections may be transmitted to neonates; however, hepatitis B virus transmission is effectively prevented with perinatal hepatitis B vaccination and prophylaxis with hepatitis B immune globulin. Cholelithiasis occurs in 6 percent of pregnancies; complications can safely be treated with surgery. Women with chronic liver disease or cirrhosis exhibit a higher risk of fetal loss during pregnancy. Preeclampsia is associated with HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count) syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and hepatic infarction and rupture. These rare diseases result in increased maternal and fetal mortality. Treatment involves prompt delivery, whereupon the liver disease quickly reverses. Therapy with penicillamine, trientine, prednisone or azathioprine can be safely continued during pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10068707

Citation

Hunt, C M., and A I. Sharara. "Liver Disease in Pregnancy." American Family Physician, vol. 59, no. 4, 1999, pp. 829-36.
Hunt CM, Sharara AI. Liver disease in pregnancy. Am Fam Physician. 1999;59(4):829-36.
Hunt, C. M., & Sharara, A. I. (1999). Liver disease in pregnancy. American Family Physician, 59(4), 829-36.
Hunt CM, Sharara AI. Liver Disease in Pregnancy. Am Fam Physician. 1999 Feb 15;59(4):829-36. PubMed PMID: 10068707.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Liver disease in pregnancy. AU - Hunt,C M, AU - Sharara,A I, PY - 1999/3/9/pubmed PY - 1999/3/9/medline PY - 1999/3/9/entrez SP - 829 EP - 36 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - Acute viral hepatitis is the most common cause of jaundice in pregnancy. The course of acute hepatitis is unaffected by pregnancy, except in patients with hepatitis E and disseminated herpes simplex infections, in which maternal and fetal mortality rates are significantly increased. Chronic hepatitis B or C infections may be transmitted to neonates; however, hepatitis B virus transmission is effectively prevented with perinatal hepatitis B vaccination and prophylaxis with hepatitis B immune globulin. Cholelithiasis occurs in 6 percent of pregnancies; complications can safely be treated with surgery. Women with chronic liver disease or cirrhosis exhibit a higher risk of fetal loss during pregnancy. Preeclampsia is associated with HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count) syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and hepatic infarction and rupture. These rare diseases result in increased maternal and fetal mortality. Treatment involves prompt delivery, whereupon the liver disease quickly reverses. Therapy with penicillamine, trientine, prednisone or azathioprine can be safely continued during pregnancy. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10068707/Liver_disease_in_pregnancy_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -