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What influences the uptake and early cessation of breast feeding?
Midwifery 1998; 14(4):242-7M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine obstetric, maternal and social factors associated with the uptake and early cessation of breast feeding and women's reasons for altering from breast to bottle feeding.

DESIGN

Women who responded to a postal questionnaire on long-term postpartum health were contacted and asked to participate in a home-based interview. In addition to health problems, the interview obtained information on baby feeding and a number of social factors. Women were also asked to complete the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Obstetric and maternal data were obtained from maternity records.

SETTING

Deliveries from a large maternity hospital in Birmingham.

PARTICIPANTS

906 women were interviewed at a mean of 45 weeks after delivery.

FINDINGS

63% of the women said they had breast fed, but 40% of these stopped within three months of delivery. Many of the women gave physical problems with lactation as reasons for stopping. The factors found to be predictors of early cessation were: return to work within three months of birth; regular childcare support from other female relatives, and a high EPDS score. Non-initiation of breast feeding was predicted by a different set of factors: multiparity; general anaesthetic (GA); and unmarried status.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION

Despite evidence of the benefits of breast feeding, this remains an unacceptable long-term option for many women, and for over one-third it is never attempted. Factors within the woman's social environment were found to influence early cessation. Women who had a GA during or immediately following labour and delivery were less likely to initiate breast feeding.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

If breast-feeding incidence and duration are to increase, more attention should be paid to establishing early, successful breast feeding and countering the negative influences of factors within the social environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Birmingham, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10076319

Citation

Bick, D E., et al. "What Influences the Uptake and Early Cessation of Breast Feeding?" Midwifery, vol. 14, no. 4, 1998, pp. 242-7.
Bick DE, MacArthur C, Lancashire RJ. What influences the uptake and early cessation of breast feeding? Midwifery. 1998;14(4):242-7.
Bick, D. E., MacArthur, C., & Lancashire, R. J. (1998). What influences the uptake and early cessation of breast feeding? Midwifery, 14(4), pp. 242-7.
Bick DE, MacArthur C, Lancashire RJ. What Influences the Uptake and Early Cessation of Breast Feeding. Midwifery. 1998;14(4):242-7. PubMed PMID: 10076319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What influences the uptake and early cessation of breast feeding? AU - Bick,D E, AU - MacArthur,C, AU - Lancashire,R J, PY - 1999/3/17/pubmed PY - 2000/2/19/medline PY - 1999/3/17/entrez SP - 242 EP - 7 JF - Midwifery JO - Midwifery VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine obstetric, maternal and social factors associated with the uptake and early cessation of breast feeding and women's reasons for altering from breast to bottle feeding. DESIGN: Women who responded to a postal questionnaire on long-term postpartum health were contacted and asked to participate in a home-based interview. In addition to health problems, the interview obtained information on baby feeding and a number of social factors. Women were also asked to complete the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Obstetric and maternal data were obtained from maternity records. SETTING: Deliveries from a large maternity hospital in Birmingham. PARTICIPANTS: 906 women were interviewed at a mean of 45 weeks after delivery. FINDINGS: 63% of the women said they had breast fed, but 40% of these stopped within three months of delivery. Many of the women gave physical problems with lactation as reasons for stopping. The factors found to be predictors of early cessation were: return to work within three months of birth; regular childcare support from other female relatives, and a high EPDS score. Non-initiation of breast feeding was predicted by a different set of factors: multiparity; general anaesthetic (GA); and unmarried status. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Despite evidence of the benefits of breast feeding, this remains an unacceptable long-term option for many women, and for over one-third it is never attempted. Factors within the woman's social environment were found to influence early cessation. Women who had a GA during or immediately following labour and delivery were less likely to initiate breast feeding. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: If breast-feeding incidence and duration are to increase, more attention should be paid to establishing early, successful breast feeding and countering the negative influences of factors within the social environment. SN - 0266-6138 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10076319/What_influences_the_uptake_and_early_cessation_of_breast_feeding L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/breastfeeding.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -