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Chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, responsive to immunoglobulins.
Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol. 1999 Jan-Feb; 39(1):33-7.EC

Abstract

The association of central and peripheral demyelination was reported previously. Most of the cases refer to central chronic relapsing demyelination with clinical criteria for multiple sclerosis associated with later signs of peripheral nerve involvement. Other authors, described central lesions in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and in Guillain-Barré syndrome, as a seldom occurrence. We report a patient in which a chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor nervous system demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, was identified. The patient improved after intravenous immunoglobulin suggesting an immune-mediated mechanism. To our knowledge this presentation was not described before.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10076759

Citation

Bentes, C, et al. "Chronic Steadily Progressive Central and Peripheral Predominantly Motor Demyelination, Involving the Cranial Nerves, Responsive to Immunoglobulins." Electromyography and Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 39, no. 1, 1999, pp. 33-7.
Bentes C, de Carvalho M, de Sá J, et al. Chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, responsive to immunoglobulins. Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol. 1999;39(1):33-7.
Bentes, C., de Carvalho, M., de Sá, J., & Luís, M. L. (1999). Chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, responsive to immunoglobulins. Electromyography and Clinical Neurophysiology, 39(1), 33-7.
Bentes C, et al. Chronic Steadily Progressive Central and Peripheral Predominantly Motor Demyelination, Involving the Cranial Nerves, Responsive to Immunoglobulins. Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol. 1999 Jan-Feb;39(1):33-7. PubMed PMID: 10076759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, responsive to immunoglobulins. AU - Bentes,C, AU - de Carvalho,M, AU - de Sá,J, AU - Luís,M L, PY - 1999/3/17/pubmed PY - 1999/3/17/medline PY - 1999/3/17/entrez SP - 33 EP - 7 JF - Electromyography and clinical neurophysiology JO - Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - The association of central and peripheral demyelination was reported previously. Most of the cases refer to central chronic relapsing demyelination with clinical criteria for multiple sclerosis associated with later signs of peripheral nerve involvement. Other authors, described central lesions in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and in Guillain-Barré syndrome, as a seldom occurrence. We report a patient in which a chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor nervous system demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, was identified. The patient improved after intravenous immunoglobulin suggesting an immune-mediated mechanism. To our knowledge this presentation was not described before. SN - 0301-150X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10076759/Chronic_steadily_progressive_central_and_peripheral_predominantly_motor_demyelination_involving_the_cranial_nerves_responsive_to_immunoglobulins_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/braindiseases.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -