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Inverse graded relation between alcohol consumption and active infection with Helicobacter pylori.
Am J Epidemiol 1999; 149(6):571-6AJ

Abstract

Alcoholic beverages are known to have strong antibacterial activity. It is unclear, however, to what degree their consumption affects colonization of the human stomach with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, a risk factor of various chronic diseases. The authors assessed the relation between alcohol consumption and active infection with H. pylori in a cross-sectional study among employees of a health insurance company and their household members (n = 425) in southern Germany. Quantitative information on alcohol consumption by beverage type and other factors that were known or suspected to be related to infection status was collected by a standardized questionnaire, and active infection was measured by the 13C-urea breath test. After control for confounding factors, there was a monotonic inverse graded relation between alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection (p for trend = 0.017). The odds ratio of infection among subjects who consumed more than 75 g of alcohol per week compared with subjects who did not drink alcohol was 0.31 (95 percent confidence interval 0.12-0.81). The inverse relation with H. pylori infection was stronger for alcohol consumed in the form of wine than for alcohol from beer. Notwithstanding its cross-sectional design, this study seems to support the hypothesis that alcohol consumption, particularly wine consumption, may reduce the odds of active infection with H. pylori.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Ulm, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10084247

Citation

Brenner, H, et al. "Inverse Graded Relation Between Alcohol Consumption and Active Infection With Helicobacter Pylori." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 149, no. 6, 1999, pp. 571-6.
Brenner H, Rothenbacher D, Bode G, et al. Inverse graded relation between alcohol consumption and active infection with Helicobacter pylori. Am J Epidemiol. 1999;149(6):571-6.
Brenner, H., Rothenbacher, D., Bode, G., & Adler, G. (1999). Inverse graded relation between alcohol consumption and active infection with Helicobacter pylori. American Journal of Epidemiology, 149(6), pp. 571-6.
Brenner H, et al. Inverse Graded Relation Between Alcohol Consumption and Active Infection With Helicobacter Pylori. Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 15;149(6):571-6. PubMed PMID: 10084247.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inverse graded relation between alcohol consumption and active infection with Helicobacter pylori. AU - Brenner,H, AU - Rothenbacher,D, AU - Bode,G, AU - Adler,G, PY - 1999/3/20/pubmed PY - 1999/3/20/medline PY - 1999/3/20/entrez SP - 571 EP - 6 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 149 IS - 6 N2 - Alcoholic beverages are known to have strong antibacterial activity. It is unclear, however, to what degree their consumption affects colonization of the human stomach with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, a risk factor of various chronic diseases. The authors assessed the relation between alcohol consumption and active infection with H. pylori in a cross-sectional study among employees of a health insurance company and their household members (n = 425) in southern Germany. Quantitative information on alcohol consumption by beverage type and other factors that were known or suspected to be related to infection status was collected by a standardized questionnaire, and active infection was measured by the 13C-urea breath test. After control for confounding factors, there was a monotonic inverse graded relation between alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection (p for trend = 0.017). The odds ratio of infection among subjects who consumed more than 75 g of alcohol per week compared with subjects who did not drink alcohol was 0.31 (95 percent confidence interval 0.12-0.81). The inverse relation with H. pylori infection was stronger for alcohol consumed in the form of wine than for alcohol from beer. Notwithstanding its cross-sectional design, this study seems to support the hypothesis that alcohol consumption, particularly wine consumption, may reduce the odds of active infection with H. pylori. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10084247/Inverse_graded_relation_between_alcohol_consumption_and_active_infection_with_Helicobacter_pylori_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a009854 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -