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Exercise clinical trials in cancer prevention research: a call to action.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999 Mar; 8(3):201-7.CE

Abstract

The experimental study design can yield valuable information in measuring the association between physical activity and occurrence of cancers. Randomized clinical exercise trials can provide insight into the avenues through which physical activity might affect cancer development and can provide experience with diffusing an exercise intervention into certain populations. This report describes the potential utility of the randomized clinical trial design in providing answers about bias, mechanisms, behavior change, and dose-response in defining the causal pathway between physical activity and cancer. The challenges and limitations of exercise clinical trial are discussed. The research experience in cardiovascular disease and exercise is used as a model for developing a research agenda to explore the potential role of physical activity as a cancer-prevention modality. We recommend that a series of small clinical trials of exercise interventions be conducted to measure exercise change effects on biomarkers for cancer risk, to learn about exercise behavior change in individuals at risk for cancer, and to serve as feasibility studies for larger randomized controlled trials of cancer and precursor end points and for community intervention studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Prevention Research Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10090297

Citation

McTiernan, A, et al. "Exercise Clinical Trials in Cancer Prevention Research: a Call to Action." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 8, no. 3, 1999, pp. 201-7.
McTiernan A, Schwartz RS, Potter J, et al. Exercise clinical trials in cancer prevention research: a call to action. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(3):201-7.
McTiernan, A., Schwartz, R. S., Potter, J., & Bowen, D. (1999). Exercise clinical trials in cancer prevention research: a call to action. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 8(3), 201-7.
McTiernan A, et al. Exercise Clinical Trials in Cancer Prevention Research: a Call to Action. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(3):201-7. PubMed PMID: 10090297.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exercise clinical trials in cancer prevention research: a call to action. AU - McTiernan,A, AU - Schwartz,R S, AU - Potter,J, AU - Bowen,D, PY - 1999/3/25/pubmed PY - 1999/3/25/medline PY - 1999/3/25/entrez SP - 201 EP - 7 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - The experimental study design can yield valuable information in measuring the association between physical activity and occurrence of cancers. Randomized clinical exercise trials can provide insight into the avenues through which physical activity might affect cancer development and can provide experience with diffusing an exercise intervention into certain populations. This report describes the potential utility of the randomized clinical trial design in providing answers about bias, mechanisms, behavior change, and dose-response in defining the causal pathway between physical activity and cancer. The challenges and limitations of exercise clinical trial are discussed. The research experience in cardiovascular disease and exercise is used as a model for developing a research agenda to explore the potential role of physical activity as a cancer-prevention modality. We recommend that a series of small clinical trials of exercise interventions be conducted to measure exercise change effects on biomarkers for cancer risk, to learn about exercise behavior change in individuals at risk for cancer, and to serve as feasibility studies for larger randomized controlled trials of cancer and precursor end points and for community intervention studies. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10090297/Exercise_clinical_trials_in_cancer_prevention_research:_a_call_to_action_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10090297 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -