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Preparing for managed competition.
Physician Exec. 1994 Jan; 20(1):29-35.PE

Abstract

Without the demands of managed competition or economic incentives to control costs, providers have little reason to invest in systematic data analysis about their patients. Information technologies in the hands of health care managers and physician executives primarily are tools for cost control, and, if cost control is not an important issue for them, they do not learn how to do it. The rules of the game have already changed for providers where managed care dominates the medical community and will change for the entire nation under managed competition. Managed competition gives providers strong incentives to identify the costs of care and unnecessary variations in those costs, to introduce new processes of care to reduce unnecessary administrative and clinical costs, to implement practice guidelines to reduce variations in outcomes of care, and to document statistics indicating excellent quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INOVA Health Systems, Springfield, VA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10132125

Citation

Ruffin, M. "Preparing for Managed Competition." Physician Executive, vol. 20, no. 1, 1994, pp. 29-35.
Ruffin M. Preparing for managed competition. Physician Exec. 1994;20(1):29-35.
Ruffin, M. (1994). Preparing for managed competition. Physician Executive, 20(1), 29-35.
Ruffin M. Preparing for Managed Competition. Physician Exec. 1994;20(1):29-35. PubMed PMID: 10132125.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preparing for managed competition. A1 - Ruffin,M,Jr PY - 1993/12/9/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1993/12/9/entrez SP - 29 EP - 35 JF - Physician executive JO - Physician Exec VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - Without the demands of managed competition or economic incentives to control costs, providers have little reason to invest in systematic data analysis about their patients. Information technologies in the hands of health care managers and physician executives primarily are tools for cost control, and, if cost control is not an important issue for them, they do not learn how to do it. The rules of the game have already changed for providers where managed care dominates the medical community and will change for the entire nation under managed competition. Managed competition gives providers strong incentives to identify the costs of care and unnecessary variations in those costs, to introduce new processes of care to reduce unnecessary administrative and clinical costs, to implement practice guidelines to reduce variations in outcomes of care, and to document statistics indicating excellent quality. SN - 0898-2759 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10132125/Preparing_for_managed_competition_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/managedcare.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -