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Assessing the educational preparation of clinical laboratory scientists.
Clin Lab Sci 1994 Sep-Oct; 7(5):293-9CL

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the educational preparation of clinical laboratory science (CLS) graduates using an approach that addresses the general education and professional components of the curriculum and includes multiple programs.

DESIGN

Survey of a convenience sample.

SETTING

Four CLS programs in North Carolina.

PARTICIPANTS

CLS graduates with one, three, and five years of experience.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Results of 48 competency statements rated by graduates for level of preparation and importance in current jobs.

RESULTS

Graduates indicated that they were well prepared in most conceptual and technical competencies with the exception of computers and management. Preparation in career marketability skills (interviewing, writing résumés, and career planning), contextual competence (understanding socioeconomic and governmental issues), and scholarly concern for professional improvement (research skills) was rated relatively low. Graduates considered the conceptual and technical competencies related to their current specialty as very important for their jobs. They also rated professional ethics, communication skills, and integrative competencies as very important for practice. Graduates in supervisory positions rated communication competencies significantly higher in importance than did graduates in other positions. Graduates rated as relatively unimportant competencies in conceptual and technical skills unrelated to their current specialties and scholarly concern for professional improvement.

CONCLUSION

In the professional component of the curriculum, educators should review the amount of conceptual and technical content required and the level of preparation in career marketability skills. In the general education component of the curriculum, CLS students' preparation in contextual competencies and communication skills should be reviewed and strengthened.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical Laboratory Science, Medical School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 27599-7145, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10150384

Citation

Beck, S J.. "Assessing the Educational Preparation of Clinical Laboratory Scientists." Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, vol. 7, no. 5, 1994, pp. 293-9.
Beck SJ. Assessing the educational preparation of clinical laboratory scientists. Clin Lab Sci. 1994;7(5):293-9.
Beck, S. J. (1994). Assessing the educational preparation of clinical laboratory scientists. Clinical Laboratory Science : Journal of the American Society for Medical Technology, 7(5), pp. 293-9.
Beck SJ. Assessing the Educational Preparation of Clinical Laboratory Scientists. Clin Lab Sci. 1994;7(5):293-9. PubMed PMID: 10150384.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessing the educational preparation of clinical laboratory scientists. A1 - Beck,S J, PY - 1994/8/6/pubmed PY - 1994/8/6/medline PY - 1994/8/6/entrez SP - 293 EP - 9 JF - Clinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology JO - Clin Lab Sci VL - 7 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the educational preparation of clinical laboratory science (CLS) graduates using an approach that addresses the general education and professional components of the curriculum and includes multiple programs. DESIGN: Survey of a convenience sample. SETTING: Four CLS programs in North Carolina. PARTICIPANTS: CLS graduates with one, three, and five years of experience. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Results of 48 competency statements rated by graduates for level of preparation and importance in current jobs. RESULTS: Graduates indicated that they were well prepared in most conceptual and technical competencies with the exception of computers and management. Preparation in career marketability skills (interviewing, writing résumés, and career planning), contextual competence (understanding socioeconomic and governmental issues), and scholarly concern for professional improvement (research skills) was rated relatively low. Graduates considered the conceptual and technical competencies related to their current specialty as very important for their jobs. They also rated professional ethics, communication skills, and integrative competencies as very important for practice. Graduates in supervisory positions rated communication competencies significantly higher in importance than did graduates in other positions. Graduates rated as relatively unimportant competencies in conceptual and technical skills unrelated to their current specialties and scholarly concern for professional improvement. CONCLUSION: In the professional component of the curriculum, educators should review the amount of conceptual and technical content required and the level of preparation in career marketability skills. In the general education component of the curriculum, CLS students' preparation in contextual competencies and communication skills should be reviewed and strengthened. SN - 0894-959X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10150384/Assessing_the_educational_preparation_of_clinical_laboratory_scientists_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -