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Social inequality and children's growth in Guatemala.
Health Transit Rev. 1995 Apr; 5(1):1-20.HT

Abstract

This paper is an investigation of the effects of social inequality in Guatemala on children's health and nutritional status as measured by attained height. Guatemala remains a highly stratified and poor society. We examine the association of land distribution, land tenure, occupation, and other aspects of family social and economic status with children's height between the ages of three months and 36 months, using data from a cross-sectional survey. An important consequence of the poverty and poor living conditions of the majority of the Guatemalan population is substantial deficits in children's growth. Our results suggest that children's growth is affected by ethnicity, their father's occupation, land distribution in the area where they live, and maternal education. Substantial growth deficits are observed among children living at altitudes above 1500 metres; we hypothesize that this is because, in Guatemala, higher altitude is associated with land scarcity, poorer agricultural conditions, and greater remoteness from transport networks and other public services.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office of Population Research, Princeton University, NJ 08540, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10150528

Citation

Pebley, A R., and N Goldman. "Social Inequality and Children's Growth in Guatemala." Health Transition Review : the Cultural, Social, and Behavioural Determinants of Health, vol. 5, no. 1, 1995, pp. 1-20.
Pebley AR, Goldman N. Social inequality and children's growth in Guatemala. Health Transit Rev. 1995;5(1):1-20.
Pebley, A. R., & Goldman, N. (1995). Social inequality and children's growth in Guatemala. Health Transition Review : the Cultural, Social, and Behavioural Determinants of Health, 5(1), 1-20.
Pebley AR, Goldman N. Social Inequality and Children's Growth in Guatemala. Health Transit Rev. 1995;5(1):1-20. PubMed PMID: 10150528.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social inequality and children's growth in Guatemala. AU - Pebley,A R, AU - Goldman,N, PY - 1995/3/9/pubmed PY - 1995/3/9/medline PY - 1995/3/9/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Altitude KW - Americas KW - Anthropometry KW - Biology KW - Body Height KW - Central America KW - Child KW - Child Development KW - Child Nutrition KW - Cultural Background KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Economic Factors KW - Environment KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Growth KW - Guatemala KW - Health KW - Indians, North American KW - Inequalities KW - Latin America KW - Measurement KW - North America KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Surveys KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Poverty KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Youth SP - 1 EP - 20 JF - Health transition review : the cultural, social, and behavioural determinants of health JO - Health Transit Rev VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - This paper is an investigation of the effects of social inequality in Guatemala on children's health and nutritional status as measured by attained height. Guatemala remains a highly stratified and poor society. We examine the association of land distribution, land tenure, occupation, and other aspects of family social and economic status with children's height between the ages of three months and 36 months, using data from a cross-sectional survey. An important consequence of the poverty and poor living conditions of the majority of the Guatemalan population is substantial deficits in children's growth. Our results suggest that children's growth is affected by ethnicity, their father's occupation, land distribution in the area where they live, and maternal education. Substantial growth deficits are observed among children living at altitudes above 1500 metres; we hypothesize that this is because, in Guatemala, higher altitude is associated with land scarcity, poorer agricultural conditions, and greater remoteness from transport networks and other public services. SN - 1036-4005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10150528/Social_inequality_and_children's_growth_in_Guatemala_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -