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Dietary patterns of men and women suggest targets for health promotion: the Framingham Nutrition Studies.
Am J Health Promot. 1996 Sep-Oct; 11(1):42-52; discussion 52-3.AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

The goal of the study was to characterize the dietary patterns of adult men and women.

DESIGN

The study used a cross-sectional analysis of food consumption behaviors and nutrient intake measured from 1984 through 1988.

SETTING

The Framingham Offspring/Spouse Study, Framingham, Massachusetts.

SUBJECTS

The population-based sample comprised 1831 men and 1828 women between 20 and 70 years of age.

MEASURES

Dietary patterns were defined by cluster analyses, which used the estimates of usual daily food intake from food frequency questionnaires, and the patterns were compared with Food Guide Pyramid recommendations. Nutrient intakes were independently estimated from 24-hour recalls and compared with Year 2000 nutrition recommendations.

RESULTS

Cluster analyses identified five groups of men and five groups of women with distinctive dietary patterns. Men differed on intakes of all food groups except vegetables and snacks plus sweetened beverages. Specific dietary behaviors, including low intakes of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and other complex carbohydrates; high intakes of beer and liquor; and high intakes of high-fat animal foods warrant targeted intervention messages for men. Women's patterns differed across all food groups except red meats and fattier poultry and beer. Dietary behaviors of women that deserve attention include low fruit, vegetable, starch, and dietary intakes; chronic dieting; high alcohol intake; and sources of hidden fats. No cluster met the current recommendations for food and nutrient intake.

CONCLUSIONS

Distinct dietary patterns in Framingham men and women vary in compliance with national nutrition and health policy objectives and provide insights for developing behavioral interventions to improve food and nutrient intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Boston University School of Public Health, MA 02118, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10163450

Citation

Millen, B E., et al. "Dietary Patterns of Men and Women Suggest Targets for Health Promotion: the Framingham Nutrition Studies." American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, vol. 11, no. 1, 1996, pp. 42-52; discussion 52-3.
Millen BE, Quatromoni PA, Gagnon DR, et al. Dietary patterns of men and women suggest targets for health promotion: the Framingham Nutrition Studies. Am J Health Promot. 1996;11(1):42-52; discussion 52-3.
Millen, B. E., Quatromoni, P. A., Gagnon, D. R., Cupples, L. A., Franz, M. M., & D'Agostino, R. B. (1996). Dietary patterns of men and women suggest targets for health promotion: the Framingham Nutrition Studies. American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, 11(1), 42-52; discussion 52-3.
Millen BE, et al. Dietary Patterns of Men and Women Suggest Targets for Health Promotion: the Framingham Nutrition Studies. Am J Health Promot. 1996 Sep-Oct;11(1):42-52; discussion 52-3. PubMed PMID: 10163450.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns of men and women suggest targets for health promotion: the Framingham Nutrition Studies. AU - Millen,B E, AU - Quatromoni,P A, AU - Gagnon,D R, AU - Cupples,L A, AU - Franz,M M, AU - D'Agostino,R B, PY - 1996/8/5/pubmed PY - 1996/8/5/medline PY - 1996/8/5/entrez SP - 42-52; discussion 52-3 JF - American journal of health promotion : AJHP JO - Am J Health Promot VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: The goal of the study was to characterize the dietary patterns of adult men and women. DESIGN: The study used a cross-sectional analysis of food consumption behaviors and nutrient intake measured from 1984 through 1988. SETTING: The Framingham Offspring/Spouse Study, Framingham, Massachusetts. SUBJECTS: The population-based sample comprised 1831 men and 1828 women between 20 and 70 years of age. MEASURES: Dietary patterns were defined by cluster analyses, which used the estimates of usual daily food intake from food frequency questionnaires, and the patterns were compared with Food Guide Pyramid recommendations. Nutrient intakes were independently estimated from 24-hour recalls and compared with Year 2000 nutrition recommendations. RESULTS: Cluster analyses identified five groups of men and five groups of women with distinctive dietary patterns. Men differed on intakes of all food groups except vegetables and snacks plus sweetened beverages. Specific dietary behaviors, including low intakes of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and other complex carbohydrates; high intakes of beer and liquor; and high intakes of high-fat animal foods warrant targeted intervention messages for men. Women's patterns differed across all food groups except red meats and fattier poultry and beer. Dietary behaviors of women that deserve attention include low fruit, vegetable, starch, and dietary intakes; chronic dieting; high alcohol intake; and sources of hidden fats. No cluster met the current recommendations for food and nutrient intake. CONCLUSIONS: Distinct dietary patterns in Framingham men and women vary in compliance with national nutrition and health policy objectives and provide insights for developing behavioral interventions to improve food and nutrient intake. SN - 0890-1171 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10163450/Dietary_patterns_of_men_and_women_suggest_targets_for_health_promotion:_the_Framingham_Nutrition_Studies_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.4278/0890-1171-11.1.42?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -