Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Current trends in the integration and reimbursement of complementary and alternative medicine by managed care, insurance carriers, and hospital providers.
Am J Health Promot. 1997 Nov-Dec; 12(2):112-22.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the status of managed care and insurance coverage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the integration of such services offered by hospitals.

METHODS

A literature review and information search was conducted to determine which insurers had special policies for CAM and which hospitals were offering CAM. Telephone interviews were conducted with a definitive sample of 18 insurers and a representative subsample of seven hospitals.

RESULTS

A majority of the insurers interviewed offered some coverage for the following: nutrition counseling, biofeedback, psychotherapy, acupuncture, preventive medicine, chiropractic, osteopathy, and physical therapy. Twelve insurers said that market demand was their primary motivation for covering CAM. Factors determining whether insurers would offer coverage for additional therapies included potential cost-effectiveness based on consumer interest, demonstrable clinical efficacy, and state mandates. Some hospitals are also responding to consumer interest in CAM, although hospitals can only offer CAM therapies for which local, licensed practitioners are available. Among the most common obstacles listed to incorporating CAM into mainstream health care were lack of research on efficacy, economics, ignorance about CAM, provider competition and division, and lack of standards of practice.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumer demand for CAM is motivating more insurers and hospitals to assess the benefits of incorporating CAM. Outcomes studies for both allopathic and CAM therapies are needed to help create a health care system based upon treatments that work, whether they are mainstream, complementary, or alternative.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94304-1825, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10174663

Citation

Pelletier, K R., et al. "Current Trends in the Integration and Reimbursement of Complementary and Alternative Medicine By Managed Care, Insurance Carriers, and Hospital Providers." American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, vol. 12, no. 2, 1997, pp. 112-22.
Pelletier KR, Marie A, Krasner M, et al. Current trends in the integration and reimbursement of complementary and alternative medicine by managed care, insurance carriers, and hospital providers. Am J Health Promot. 1997;12(2):112-22.
Pelletier, K. R., Marie, A., Krasner, M., & Haskell, W. L. (1997). Current trends in the integration and reimbursement of complementary and alternative medicine by managed care, insurance carriers, and hospital providers. American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, 12(2), 112-22.
Pelletier KR, et al. Current Trends in the Integration and Reimbursement of Complementary and Alternative Medicine By Managed Care, Insurance Carriers, and Hospital Providers. Am J Health Promot. 1997 Nov-Dec;12(2):112-22. PubMed PMID: 10174663.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current trends in the integration and reimbursement of complementary and alternative medicine by managed care, insurance carriers, and hospital providers. AU - Pelletier,K R, AU - Marie,A, AU - Krasner,M, AU - Haskell,W L, PY - 1997/10/4/pubmed PY - 1997/10/4/medline PY - 1997/10/4/entrez SP - 112 EP - 22 JF - American journal of health promotion : AJHP JO - Am J Health Promot VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the status of managed care and insurance coverage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the integration of such services offered by hospitals. METHODS: A literature review and information search was conducted to determine which insurers had special policies for CAM and which hospitals were offering CAM. Telephone interviews were conducted with a definitive sample of 18 insurers and a representative subsample of seven hospitals. RESULTS: A majority of the insurers interviewed offered some coverage for the following: nutrition counseling, biofeedback, psychotherapy, acupuncture, preventive medicine, chiropractic, osteopathy, and physical therapy. Twelve insurers said that market demand was their primary motivation for covering CAM. Factors determining whether insurers would offer coverage for additional therapies included potential cost-effectiveness based on consumer interest, demonstrable clinical efficacy, and state mandates. Some hospitals are also responding to consumer interest in CAM, although hospitals can only offer CAM therapies for which local, licensed practitioners are available. Among the most common obstacles listed to incorporating CAM into mainstream health care were lack of research on efficacy, economics, ignorance about CAM, provider competition and division, and lack of standards of practice. CONCLUSIONS: Consumer demand for CAM is motivating more insurers and hospitals to assess the benefits of incorporating CAM. Outcomes studies for both allopathic and CAM therapies are needed to help create a health care system based upon treatments that work, whether they are mainstream, complementary, or alternative. SN - 0890-1171 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10174663/Current_trends_in_the_integration_and_reimbursement_of_complementary_and_alternative_medicine_by_managed_care_insurance_carriers_and_hospital_providers_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.4278/0890-1171-12.2.112?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -