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Prevalence of hepatitis G virus RNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive intravenous drug users.
J Hum Virol. 1998 Jan-Feb; 1(2):96-100.JH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of the new human flavivirus hepatitis G virus (HGV) in Italian intravenous drug users (IDUs) and its interaction with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV).

STUDY DESIGN/METHODS

Seventy-nine IDUs with different clinical stages of HIV-1 infection and 20 non-IDU patients with chronic HCV infection were included in the study. HGV RNA was detected by means of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) used for the amplification of two HGV-related sequences included in the 5'-noncoding (NCR) and NS5a regions.

RESULTS

Eighteen (22.8%) of the 79 IDUs were positive for plasma HGV RNA; there was no difference in mean serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels between the HGV-positive and HGV-negative patients. No significant correlation was observed between HGV and other viral markers (hepatitis B virus [HBV], HCV, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II [HTLV-II]) or HCV genotype. The number of patients with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in whom HGV RNA was detected was significantly lower than the number of those who were asymptomatic (6 of 49 [12.2%] versus 12 of 30 [40%]; P = 0.004). The mean plasma HGV RNA titer was higher in the asymptomatic than in the symptomatic patients (4.6 versus 3.2 log PCR-amplified units in 1 mL of plasma sample [PU/mL]; P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results show a considerable spread of HGV levels among Italian HIV-1-positive IDUs and do not indicate that HGV infection enhances liver impairment. We suggest that the greater prevalence of HGV RNA in IDUs with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection may reflect the relatively recent HGV infection in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Milan, Italy. zehender@imiucca.csi.unimi.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10195238

Citation

Zehender, G, et al. "Prevalence of Hepatitis G Virus RNA in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-positive Intravenous Drug Users." Journal of Human Virology, vol. 1, no. 2, 1998, pp. 96-100.
Zehender G, De Maddalena C, Bosisio AB, et al. Prevalence of hepatitis G virus RNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive intravenous drug users. J Hum Virol. 1998;1(2):96-100.
Zehender, G., De Maddalena, C., Bosisio, A. B., Gianotto, M., Santambrogio, S., Moroni, M., & Galli, M. (1998). Prevalence of hepatitis G virus RNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive intravenous drug users. Journal of Human Virology, 1(2), 96-100.
Zehender G, et al. Prevalence of Hepatitis G Virus RNA in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-positive Intravenous Drug Users. J Hum Virol. 1998 Jan-Feb;1(2):96-100. PubMed PMID: 10195238.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of hepatitis G virus RNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive intravenous drug users. AU - Zehender,G, AU - De Maddalena,C, AU - Bosisio,A B, AU - Gianotto,M, AU - Santambrogio,S, AU - Moroni,M, AU - Galli,M, PY - 1999/4/9/pubmed PY - 1999/4/9/medline PY - 1999/4/9/entrez SP - 96 EP - 100 JF - Journal of human virology JO - J Hum Virol VL - 1 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of the new human flavivirus hepatitis G virus (HGV) in Italian intravenous drug users (IDUs) and its interaction with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). STUDY DESIGN/METHODS: Seventy-nine IDUs with different clinical stages of HIV-1 infection and 20 non-IDU patients with chronic HCV infection were included in the study. HGV RNA was detected by means of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) used for the amplification of two HGV-related sequences included in the 5'-noncoding (NCR) and NS5a regions. RESULTS: Eighteen (22.8%) of the 79 IDUs were positive for plasma HGV RNA; there was no difference in mean serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels between the HGV-positive and HGV-negative patients. No significant correlation was observed between HGV and other viral markers (hepatitis B virus [HBV], HCV, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II [HTLV-II]) or HCV genotype. The number of patients with symptomatic HIV-1 infection in whom HGV RNA was detected was significantly lower than the number of those who were asymptomatic (6 of 49 [12.2%] versus 12 of 30 [40%]; P = 0.004). The mean plasma HGV RNA titer was higher in the asymptomatic than in the symptomatic patients (4.6 versus 3.2 log PCR-amplified units in 1 mL of plasma sample [PU/mL]; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show a considerable spread of HGV levels among Italian HIV-1-positive IDUs and do not indicate that HGV infection enhances liver impairment. We suggest that the greater prevalence of HGV RNA in IDUs with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection may reflect the relatively recent HGV infection in this population. SN - 1090-9508 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10195238/Prevalence_of_hepatitis_G_virus_RNA_in_human_immunodeficiency_virus_type_1_positive_intravenous_drug_users_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/3332 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -