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Intake of vitamins B6 and C and the risk of kidney stones in women.

Abstract

Urinary oxalate is an important determinant of calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. High doses of vitamin B6 may decrease oxalate production, whereas vitamin C can be metabolized to oxalate. This study was conducted to examine the association between the intakes of vitamins B6 and C and risk of kidney stone formation in women. The relation between the intake of vitamins B6 and C and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones were prospectively studied in a cohort of 85,557 women with no history of kidney stones. Semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaires were used to assess vitamin consumption from both foods and supplements. A total of 1078 incident cases of kidney stones was documented during the 14-yr follow-up period. A high intake of vitamin B6 was inversely associated with risk of stone formation. After adjusting for other dietary factors, the relative risk of incident stone formation for women in the highest category of B6 intake (> or =40 mg/d) compared with the lowest category (<3 mg/d) was 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.44 to 0.98). In contrast, vitamin C intake was not associated with risk. The multivariate relative risk for women in the highest category of vitamin C intake (> or =1500 mg/d) compared with the lowest category (<250 mg/d) was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 0.69 to 1.64). Large doses of vitamin B6 may reduce the risk of kidney stone formation in women. Routine restriction of vitamin C to prevent stone formation appears unwarranted.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. gary.curhan@channing.harvard.edu

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Distribution
    Ascorbic Acid
    Cohort Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Data Collection
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Kidney Calculi
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Oxalates
    Prospective Studies
    Pyridoxine
    Risk Assessment
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10203369

    Citation

    Curhan, G C., et al. "Intake of Vitamins B6 and C and the Risk of Kidney Stones in Women." Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, vol. 10, no. 4, 1999, pp. 840-5.
    Curhan GC, Willett WC, Speizer FE, et al. Intake of vitamins B6 and C and the risk of kidney stones in women. J Am Soc Nephrol. 1999;10(4):840-5.
    Curhan, G. C., Willett, W. C., Speizer, F. E., & Stampfer, M. J. (1999). Intake of vitamins B6 and C and the risk of kidney stones in women. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 10(4), pp. 840-5.
    Curhan GC, et al. Intake of Vitamins B6 and C and the Risk of Kidney Stones in Women. J Am Soc Nephrol. 1999;10(4):840-5. PubMed PMID: 10203369.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of vitamins B6 and C and the risk of kidney stones in women. AU - Curhan,G C, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Speizer,F E, AU - Stampfer,M J, PY - 1999/4/15/pubmed PY - 1999/4/15/medline PY - 1999/4/15/entrez SP - 840 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN JO - J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - Urinary oxalate is an important determinant of calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. High doses of vitamin B6 may decrease oxalate production, whereas vitamin C can be metabolized to oxalate. This study was conducted to examine the association between the intakes of vitamins B6 and C and risk of kidney stone formation in women. The relation between the intake of vitamins B6 and C and the risk of symptomatic kidney stones were prospectively studied in a cohort of 85,557 women with no history of kidney stones. Semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaires were used to assess vitamin consumption from both foods and supplements. A total of 1078 incident cases of kidney stones was documented during the 14-yr follow-up period. A high intake of vitamin B6 was inversely associated with risk of stone formation. After adjusting for other dietary factors, the relative risk of incident stone formation for women in the highest category of B6 intake (> or =40 mg/d) compared with the lowest category (<3 mg/d) was 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.44 to 0.98). In contrast, vitamin C intake was not associated with risk. The multivariate relative risk for women in the highest category of vitamin C intake (> or =1500 mg/d) compared with the lowest category (<250 mg/d) was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 0.69 to 1.64). Large doses of vitamin B6 may reduce the risk of kidney stone formation in women. Routine restriction of vitamin C to prevent stone formation appears unwarranted. SN - 1046-6673 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10203369/Intake_of_vitamins_B6_and_C_and_the_risk_of_kidney_stones_in_women_ L2 - http://jasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=10203369 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -