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Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms and self-reported diagnosed 'benign prostatic hyperplasia', and their effect on quality of life in a community-based survey of men in the UK.
BJU Int. 1999 Mar; 83(4):410-5.BI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a community-based population in the UK, to measure the impact of these symptoms on quality of life and health status in men with self-reported 'benign prostatic hyperplasia' ('BPH'), and to evaluate health-seeking behaviour in this population.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

A postal survey was distributed to an age-stratified random sample of 1500 men aged 50 years or older from throughout England, Scotland and Wales. The self-administered survey included: demographic questions; the EuroQoL (EQ-5D) instrument, consisting of a health-status index questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS) on which participants rated their current health status; the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire; and a questionnaire assessing the participants' health-seeking behaviour and awareness of BPH.

RESULTS

Responses to the survey were received from 1115 (74%) of the 1500 men. Overall, 41% (450/ 088) had an IPSS of > or =8, indicating moderate-to-severe LUTS, yet only 196 men (18%) reported that they had been diagnosed with 'BPH'. Both quality of life (as measured by the EQ-5D) and general health status (as measured by the VAS) decreased as urinary symptom severity increased, and the greater the severity, the more men who reported a problem with mobility, self-care, usual activity, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression (the five domains of the EQ-5D). The possibility of symptoms worsening appeared to be the key determinant in the respondents' decisions to consult a medical professional for their LUTS. Less than 11% of the respondents were aware of the availability of specific prescription drug therapies or surgical options for the treatment of 'BPH'. The most common first treatment strategy for those consulting for symptoms was watchful waiting (34%), followed by surgery (30%) and prescription drugs (21%).

CONCLUSIONS

Moderate-to-severe LUTS were relatively common in this UK population of men over the age of 50, yet relatively few had been diagnosed with 'BPH'. As LUTS adversely affect quality of life, improved treatment options and increased public awareness of BPH and LUTS are needed to combat a problem facing the growing number of elderly men in the population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Global Health Outcomes, Glaxo Wellcome R & D, Greenford, Middlesex, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10210562

Citation

Trueman, P, et al. "Prevalence of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Self-reported Diagnosed 'benign Prostatic Hyperplasia', and Their Effect On Quality of Life in a Community-based Survey of Men in the UK." BJU International, vol. 83, no. 4, 1999, pp. 410-5.
Trueman P, Hood SC, Nayak US, et al. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms and self-reported diagnosed 'benign prostatic hyperplasia', and their effect on quality of life in a community-based survey of men in the UK. BJU Int. 1999;83(4):410-5.
Trueman, P., Hood, S. C., Nayak, U. S., & Mrazek, M. F. (1999). Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms and self-reported diagnosed 'benign prostatic hyperplasia', and their effect on quality of life in a community-based survey of men in the UK. BJU International, 83(4), 410-5.
Trueman P, et al. Prevalence of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Self-reported Diagnosed 'benign Prostatic Hyperplasia', and Their Effect On Quality of Life in a Community-based Survey of Men in the UK. BJU Int. 1999;83(4):410-5. PubMed PMID: 10210562.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms and self-reported diagnosed 'benign prostatic hyperplasia', and their effect on quality of life in a community-based survey of men in the UK. AU - Trueman,P, AU - Hood,S C, AU - Nayak,U S, AU - Mrazek,M F, PY - 1999/4/22/pubmed PY - 1999/4/22/medline PY - 1999/4/22/entrez SP - 410 EP - 5 JF - BJU international JO - BJU Int. VL - 83 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a community-based population in the UK, to measure the impact of these symptoms on quality of life and health status in men with self-reported 'benign prostatic hyperplasia' ('BPH'), and to evaluate health-seeking behaviour in this population. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A postal survey was distributed to an age-stratified random sample of 1500 men aged 50 years or older from throughout England, Scotland and Wales. The self-administered survey included: demographic questions; the EuroQoL (EQ-5D) instrument, consisting of a health-status index questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS) on which participants rated their current health status; the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire; and a questionnaire assessing the participants' health-seeking behaviour and awareness of BPH. RESULTS: Responses to the survey were received from 1115 (74%) of the 1500 men. Overall, 41% (450/ 088) had an IPSS of > or =8, indicating moderate-to-severe LUTS, yet only 196 men (18%) reported that they had been diagnosed with 'BPH'. Both quality of life (as measured by the EQ-5D) and general health status (as measured by the VAS) decreased as urinary symptom severity increased, and the greater the severity, the more men who reported a problem with mobility, self-care, usual activity, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression (the five domains of the EQ-5D). The possibility of symptoms worsening appeared to be the key determinant in the respondents' decisions to consult a medical professional for their LUTS. Less than 11% of the respondents were aware of the availability of specific prescription drug therapies or surgical options for the treatment of 'BPH'. The most common first treatment strategy for those consulting for symptoms was watchful waiting (34%), followed by surgery (30%) and prescription drugs (21%). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate-to-severe LUTS were relatively common in this UK population of men over the age of 50, yet relatively few had been diagnosed with 'BPH'. As LUTS adversely affect quality of life, improved treatment options and increased public awareness of BPH and LUTS are needed to combat a problem facing the growing number of elderly men in the population. SN - 1464-4096 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10210562/Prevalence_of_lower_urinary_tract_symptoms_and_self_reported_diagnosed_'benign_prostatic_hyperplasia'_and_their_effect_on_quality_of_life_in_a_community_based_survey_of_men_in_the_UK_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=10210562.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -