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Virus and autoimmunity: induction of autoimmune disease in mice by mouse T lymphotropic virus (MTLV) destroying CD4+ T cells.
J Immunol 1999; 162(9):5309-16JI

Abstract

Neonatal infection of the mouse T lymphotropic virus (MTLV), a member of herpes viridae, causes various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune gastritis, in selected strains of normal mice. The infection selectively depletes CD4+ T cells in the thymus and periphery for 2-3 wk from 1 wk after infection. Thymectomy 3 wk after neonatal MTLV infection enhances the autoimmune responses and produces autoimmune diseases at higher incidences and in a wider spectrum of organs than MTLV infection alone. On the other hand, inoculation of peripheral CD4+ cells from syngeneic noninfected adult mice prevents the autoimmune development. These autoimmune diseases can be adoptively transferred to syngeneic athymic nude mice by CD4+ T cells. The virus is not detected by bioassay in the organs/tissues damaged by the autoimmune responses. Furthermore, similar autoimmune diseases can be induced in normal mice by manipulating the neonatal thymus/T cells (e.g., by neonatal thymectomy) without virus infection. These results taken together indicate that neonatal MTLV infection elicits autoimmune disease by primarily affecting thymocytes/T cells, not self Ags. It may provoke or enhance thymic production of CD4+ pathogenic self-reactive T cells by altering the thymic clonal deletion mechanism, or reduce the production of CD4+ regulatory T cells controlling self-reactive T cells, or both. The possibility is discussed that other T cell-tropic viruses may cause autoimmunity in humans and animals by affecting the T cell immune system, not the self Ags to be targeted by the autoimmunity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Rockefeller University, New York 10021, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10228006

Citation

Morse, S S., et al. "Virus and Autoimmunity: Induction of Autoimmune Disease in Mice By Mouse T Lymphotropic Virus (MTLV) Destroying CD4+ T Cells." Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950), vol. 162, no. 9, 1999, pp. 5309-16.
Morse SS, Sakaguchi N, Sakaguchi S. Virus and autoimmunity: induction of autoimmune disease in mice by mouse T lymphotropic virus (MTLV) destroying CD4+ T cells. J Immunol. 1999;162(9):5309-16.
Morse, S. S., Sakaguchi, N., & Sakaguchi, S. (1999). Virus and autoimmunity: induction of autoimmune disease in mice by mouse T lymphotropic virus (MTLV) destroying CD4+ T cells. Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950), 162(9), pp. 5309-16.
Morse SS, Sakaguchi N, Sakaguchi S. Virus and Autoimmunity: Induction of Autoimmune Disease in Mice By Mouse T Lymphotropic Virus (MTLV) Destroying CD4+ T Cells. J Immunol. 1999 May 1;162(9):5309-16. PubMed PMID: 10228006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Virus and autoimmunity: induction of autoimmune disease in mice by mouse T lymphotropic virus (MTLV) destroying CD4+ T cells. AU - Morse,S S, AU - Sakaguchi,N, AU - Sakaguchi,S, PY - 1999/5/5/pubmed PY - 1999/5/5/medline PY - 1999/5/5/entrez SP - 5309 EP - 16 JF - Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) JO - J. Immunol. VL - 162 IS - 9 N2 - Neonatal infection of the mouse T lymphotropic virus (MTLV), a member of herpes viridae, causes various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune gastritis, in selected strains of normal mice. The infection selectively depletes CD4+ T cells in the thymus and periphery for 2-3 wk from 1 wk after infection. Thymectomy 3 wk after neonatal MTLV infection enhances the autoimmune responses and produces autoimmune diseases at higher incidences and in a wider spectrum of organs than MTLV infection alone. On the other hand, inoculation of peripheral CD4+ cells from syngeneic noninfected adult mice prevents the autoimmune development. These autoimmune diseases can be adoptively transferred to syngeneic athymic nude mice by CD4+ T cells. The virus is not detected by bioassay in the organs/tissues damaged by the autoimmune responses. Furthermore, similar autoimmune diseases can be induced in normal mice by manipulating the neonatal thymus/T cells (e.g., by neonatal thymectomy) without virus infection. These results taken together indicate that neonatal MTLV infection elicits autoimmune disease by primarily affecting thymocytes/T cells, not self Ags. It may provoke or enhance thymic production of CD4+ pathogenic self-reactive T cells by altering the thymic clonal deletion mechanism, or reduce the production of CD4+ regulatory T cells controlling self-reactive T cells, or both. The possibility is discussed that other T cell-tropic viruses may cause autoimmunity in humans and animals by affecting the T cell immune system, not the self Ags to be targeted by the autoimmunity. SN - 0022-1767 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10228006/Virus_and_autoimmunity:_induction_of_autoimmune_disease_in_mice_by_mouse_T_lymphotropic_virus__MTLV__destroying_CD4+_T_cells_ L2 - http://www.jimmunol.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10228006 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -