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Osteoporosis and eating disorders.
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 1999; 12(2):51-7JP

Abstract

Osteoporosis is a common complication of anorexia nervosa. Multiple factors increase risk, including decreased body weight and fat content, elevated cortisol levels, inadequate vitamin D and calcium intake, and amenorrhea and hypoestrogenemia. There is both decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption in the osteoporosis of anorexia nervosa. Treatment includes weight normalization and supplemental calcium and vitamin D. Unlike postmenopausal osteoporosis, estrogen replacement does not prevent or correct the osteoporosis that occurs in anorexia nervosa. Patients with bulimia nervosa or an eating disorder not otherwise specified may also be at risk of osteoporosis, especially if they have had a prior episode of anorexia nervosa.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10326187

Citation

Powers, P S.. "Osteoporosis and Eating Disorders." Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, vol. 12, no. 2, 1999, pp. 51-7.
Powers PS. Osteoporosis and eating disorders. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 1999;12(2):51-7.
Powers, P. S. (1999). Osteoporosis and eating disorders. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, 12(2), pp. 51-7.
Powers PS. Osteoporosis and Eating Disorders. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 1999;12(2):51-7. PubMed PMID: 10326187.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Osteoporosis and eating disorders. A1 - Powers,P S, PY - 1999/5/18/pubmed PY - 1999/5/18/medline PY - 1999/5/18/entrez SP - 51 EP - 7 JF - Journal of pediatric and adolescent gynecology JO - J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - Osteoporosis is a common complication of anorexia nervosa. Multiple factors increase risk, including decreased body weight and fat content, elevated cortisol levels, inadequate vitamin D and calcium intake, and amenorrhea and hypoestrogenemia. There is both decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption in the osteoporosis of anorexia nervosa. Treatment includes weight normalization and supplemental calcium and vitamin D. Unlike postmenopausal osteoporosis, estrogen replacement does not prevent or correct the osteoporosis that occurs in anorexia nervosa. Patients with bulimia nervosa or an eating disorder not otherwise specified may also be at risk of osteoporosis, especially if they have had a prior episode of anorexia nervosa. SN - 1083-3188 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10326187/Osteoporosis_and_eating_disorders_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1083-3188(00)86626-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -