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Soy, disease prevention, and prostate cancer.
Semin Urol Oncol 1999; 17(2):97-102SU

Abstract

Population-based studies from around the world support the theory that soy products and their constituents, primarily the isoflavones or phytoestrogens, are partly responsible for the lower rates of certain chronic diseases in different areas of the world. Cardiovascular disease and hormonally induced cancers are just a few of the conditions lower in Asian countries that consume large quantities of soy per average person. Genistein, one of soy's individual phytoestrogens, has been found to inhibit numerous breast and prostate cancer cell lines. A limited amount of clinical evidence also points to a beneficial role of soy in reducing hormonal levels and exhibiting weak estrogen and antiestrogen-like qualities. Other phytoestrogens found in nature, such as lignans, may also have a future role in cancer. Collectively, these phytoestrogens, like genistein, have enough evidence to warrant their use in a number of clinical trials as a potential chemopreventive agent or adjunct to prostate cancer treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109-0330, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10332923

Citation

Moyad, M A.. "Soy, Disease Prevention, and Prostate Cancer." Seminars in Urologic Oncology, vol. 17, no. 2, 1999, pp. 97-102.
Moyad MA. Soy, disease prevention, and prostate cancer. Semin Urol Oncol. 1999;17(2):97-102.
Moyad, M. A. (1999). Soy, disease prevention, and prostate cancer. Seminars in Urologic Oncology, 17(2), pp. 97-102.
Moyad MA. Soy, Disease Prevention, and Prostate Cancer. Semin Urol Oncol. 1999;17(2):97-102. PubMed PMID: 10332923.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Soy, disease prevention, and prostate cancer. A1 - Moyad,M A, PY - 1999/5/20/pubmed PY - 1999/5/20/medline PY - 1999/5/20/entrez SP - 97 EP - 102 JF - Seminars in urologic oncology JO - Semin. Urol. Oncol. VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - Population-based studies from around the world support the theory that soy products and their constituents, primarily the isoflavones or phytoestrogens, are partly responsible for the lower rates of certain chronic diseases in different areas of the world. Cardiovascular disease and hormonally induced cancers are just a few of the conditions lower in Asian countries that consume large quantities of soy per average person. Genistein, one of soy's individual phytoestrogens, has been found to inhibit numerous breast and prostate cancer cell lines. A limited amount of clinical evidence also points to a beneficial role of soy in reducing hormonal levels and exhibiting weak estrogen and antiestrogen-like qualities. Other phytoestrogens found in nature, such as lignans, may also have a future role in cancer. Collectively, these phytoestrogens, like genistein, have enough evidence to warrant their use in a number of clinical trials as a potential chemopreventive agent or adjunct to prostate cancer treatment. SN - 1081-0943 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10332923/Soy_disease_prevention_and_prostate_cancer_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9175 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -