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Morphology of dental enamel and dentine-enamel junction in osteogenesis imperfecta.
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1999 Mar; 9(1):13-21.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to examine the morphology of primary and permanent human enamel, and the dentine-enamel junction, in individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I, III and IV in undecalcified sections using polarized light microscopy, microradiography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and to relate the findings to the type of OI.

SAMPLE AND METHODS

Extracted or exfoliated teeth from 15 patients representing the OI types I, III and IV (12 primary teeth from seven patients, and 11 permanent teeth from eight patients). Ten primary and nine permanent teeth from normal healthy patients served as controls. The teeth were serially cut longitudinally in a bucco-lingual direction and contact microradiographs were made. The sections were examined in polarized light. Sections of primary and permanent teeth were examined by means of SEM.

RESULTS

This study shows that the permanent enamel from patients with OI exhibits few structural changes. No relationships were found between enamel morphology and the types of OI (I, III, IV). Primary enamel appeared to be slightly more irregularly mineralized, especially in cases with the additional diagnosis dentinogenesis imperfecta. The major findings were deviations in association with the dentine-enamel junction, and locally a lower degree of mineralization.

CONCLUSIONS

The mesodermal disease OI might also be manifested in ectodermal enamel, probably because of suboptimal mesenchymal-ectodermal interactions during amelogenesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg University, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10336712

Citation

Lindau, B M., et al. "Morphology of Dental Enamel and Dentine-enamel Junction in Osteogenesis Imperfecta." International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, vol. 9, no. 1, 1999, pp. 13-21.
Lindau BM, Dietz W, Hoyer I, et al. Morphology of dental enamel and dentine-enamel junction in osteogenesis imperfecta. Int J Paediatr Dent. 1999;9(1):13-21.
Lindau, B. M., Dietz, W., Hoyer, I., Lundgren, T., Storhaug, K., & Norén, J. G. (1999). Morphology of dental enamel and dentine-enamel junction in osteogenesis imperfecta. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, 9(1), 13-21.
Lindau BM, et al. Morphology of Dental Enamel and Dentine-enamel Junction in Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Int J Paediatr Dent. 1999;9(1):13-21. PubMed PMID: 10336712.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Morphology of dental enamel and dentine-enamel junction in osteogenesis imperfecta. AU - Lindau,B M, AU - Dietz,W, AU - Hoyer,I, AU - Lundgren,T, AU - Storhaug,K, AU - Norén,J G, PY - 1999/5/21/pubmed PY - 1999/5/21/medline PY - 1999/5/21/entrez SP - 13 EP - 21 JF - International journal of paediatric dentistry JO - Int J Paediatr Dent VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the morphology of primary and permanent human enamel, and the dentine-enamel junction, in individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I, III and IV in undecalcified sections using polarized light microscopy, microradiography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and to relate the findings to the type of OI. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Extracted or exfoliated teeth from 15 patients representing the OI types I, III and IV (12 primary teeth from seven patients, and 11 permanent teeth from eight patients). Ten primary and nine permanent teeth from normal healthy patients served as controls. The teeth were serially cut longitudinally in a bucco-lingual direction and contact microradiographs were made. The sections were examined in polarized light. Sections of primary and permanent teeth were examined by means of SEM. RESULTS: This study shows that the permanent enamel from patients with OI exhibits few structural changes. No relationships were found between enamel morphology and the types of OI (I, III, IV). Primary enamel appeared to be slightly more irregularly mineralized, especially in cases with the additional diagnosis dentinogenesis imperfecta. The major findings were deviations in association with the dentine-enamel junction, and locally a lower degree of mineralization. CONCLUSIONS: The mesodermal disease OI might also be manifested in ectodermal enamel, probably because of suboptimal mesenchymal-ectodermal interactions during amelogenesis. SN - 0960-7439 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10336712/Morphology_of_dental_enamel_and_dentine_enamel_junction_in_osteogenesis_imperfecta_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0960-7439&date=1999&volume=9&issue=1&spage=13 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -