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Australian bat lyssavirus infection in a captive juvenile black flying fox.
Emerg Infect Dis. 1999 May-Jun; 5(3):438-40.EI

Abstract

The newly emerging Australian bat lyssavirus causes rabieslike disease in bats and humans. A captive juvenile black flying fox exhibited progressive neurologic signs, including sudden aggression, vocalization, dysphagia, and paresis over 9 days and then died. At necropsy, lyssavirus infection was diagnosed by fluorescent antibody test, immunoperoxidase staining, polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. Eight human contacts received postexposure vaccination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Moorooka, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10341182

Citation

Field, H, et al. "Australian Bat Lyssavirus Infection in a Captive Juvenile Black Flying Fox." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 5, no. 3, 1999, pp. 438-40.
Field H, McCall B, Barrett J. Australian bat lyssavirus infection in a captive juvenile black flying fox. Emerg Infect Dis. 1999;5(3):438-40.
Field, H., McCall, B., & Barrett, J. (1999). Australian bat lyssavirus infection in a captive juvenile black flying fox. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 5(3), 438-40.
Field H, McCall B, Barrett J. Australian Bat Lyssavirus Infection in a Captive Juvenile Black Flying Fox. Emerg Infect Dis. 1999 May-Jun;5(3):438-40. PubMed PMID: 10341182.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Australian bat lyssavirus infection in a captive juvenile black flying fox. AU - Field,H, AU - McCall,B, AU - Barrett,J, PY - 1999/5/26/pubmed PY - 1999/5/26/medline PY - 1999/5/26/entrez SP - 438 EP - 40 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerg Infect Dis VL - 5 IS - 3 N2 - The newly emerging Australian bat lyssavirus causes rabieslike disease in bats and humans. A captive juvenile black flying fox exhibited progressive neurologic signs, including sudden aggression, vocalization, dysphagia, and paresis over 9 days and then died. At necropsy, lyssavirus infection was diagnosed by fluorescent antibody test, immunoperoxidase staining, polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. Eight human contacts received postexposure vaccination. SN - 1080-6040 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10341182/Australian_bat_lyssavirus_infection_in_a_captive_juvenile_black_flying_fox_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/10341182/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -