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Academic preparation for healthcare executive-track personnel.
Health Mark Q. 1998; 16(1):25-47.HM

Abstract

This study focuses on career aspirations of executive-track health care administrative personnel and their perceptions of the competencies required to become hospital chief executive officers (CEOs). This article examines these topics using the results of a 1994 survey of 162 junior- and mid-level healthcare managers who work in hospitals in a western state. Respondents included 34 CEO aspirants and 128 CEO nonaspirants. The majority of both groups reported high satisfaction with several work-related activities. Significantly more CEO nonaspirants than CEO aspirants perceived a need for additional self-development in several work areas. CEO aspirants reported that CEOs five years from now would need improved strategy formulation and negotiation skills. CEO aspirants also perceived that in the future, successful CEOs will have to be more proficient in several areas, such as interpersonal skills and medical staff relations. Three lists of academic subject matter considered important to career preparation were generated from (1) the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) undergraduate standards, combined with curriculum graduate standards of the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA); (2) study participants' responses; and (3) professional literature. When compared for relatedness, the contents of the three lists were not significantly different statistically. The implications of these findings for health administration education are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Weber State University, Ogden, UT 84408, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10345893

Citation

Smith, P M., et al. "Academic Preparation for Healthcare Executive-track Personnel." Health Marketing Quarterly, vol. 16, no. 1, 1998, pp. 25-47.
Smith PM, Vorderer LH, Dwore RB, et al. Academic preparation for healthcare executive-track personnel. Health Mark Q. 1998;16(1):25-47.
Smith, P. M., Vorderer, L. H., Dwore, R. B., Murray, B. P., Parsons, R. J., & Gustafson, G. (1998). Academic preparation for healthcare executive-track personnel. Health Marketing Quarterly, 16(1), 25-47.
Smith PM, et al. Academic Preparation for Healthcare Executive-track Personnel. Health Mark Q. 1998;16(1):25-47. PubMed PMID: 10345893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Academic preparation for healthcare executive-track personnel. AU - Smith,P M, AU - Vorderer,L H, AU - Dwore,R B, AU - Murray,B P, AU - Parsons,R J, AU - Gustafson,G, PY - 1999/5/27/pubmed PY - 1999/5/27/medline PY - 1999/5/27/entrez SP - 25 EP - 47 JF - Health marketing quarterly JO - Health Mark Q VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - This study focuses on career aspirations of executive-track health care administrative personnel and their perceptions of the competencies required to become hospital chief executive officers (CEOs). This article examines these topics using the results of a 1994 survey of 162 junior- and mid-level healthcare managers who work in hospitals in a western state. Respondents included 34 CEO aspirants and 128 CEO nonaspirants. The majority of both groups reported high satisfaction with several work-related activities. Significantly more CEO nonaspirants than CEO aspirants perceived a need for additional self-development in several work areas. CEO aspirants reported that CEOs five years from now would need improved strategy formulation and negotiation skills. CEO aspirants also perceived that in the future, successful CEOs will have to be more proficient in several areas, such as interpersonal skills and medical staff relations. Three lists of academic subject matter considered important to career preparation were generated from (1) the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) undergraduate standards, combined with curriculum graduate standards of the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA); (2) study participants' responses; and (3) professional literature. When compared for relatedness, the contents of the three lists were not significantly different statistically. The implications of these findings for health administration education are discussed. SN - 0735-9683 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10345893/Academic_preparation_for_healthcare_executive_track_personnel_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1300/J026v16n01_03 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -