Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Copperhead envenomations: clinical profiles of three different subspecies.
Vet Hum Toxicol. 1999 Jun; 41(3):149-52.VH

Abstract

Copperhead envenomation cases reported in the literature frequently lack identification of the subspecies of copperhead responsible for the envenomation. Whether subspecific identity would be useful in predicting possible different toxicity profiles may have clinical relevance. We report here the clinical profiles from envenomations involving 3 different subspecies of captive adult copperhead snakes--the southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix), the northern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen), and the broad-banded copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus). The bites occurred in the north-central region of the US where none of these subspecies are endemic and involved a professional and 2 amateur herpetologists. The victims were adult males with no previous history of venomous snake bite, and all bites were evidenced by fang puncture marks to their index finger or thumb. Envenomations from the broad-banded and northern copperhead subspecies caused localized symptoms of pain, edema and ecchymosis. In addition to these symptoms, southern copperhead envenomation resulted in a more severe clinical toxicity profile as evidenced by propulsive emesis, diarrhea and hematuria. Whether these differences in observed clinical toxicity were the result of unique subspecific venom pharmacological actions is an interesting question. However, independent of the copperhead subspecies involved, conservative medical management was effective in each case.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hennepin County Medical Center/Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Division of Toxicology, MN 55415.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10349703

Citation

Keyler, D E., and J T. Vandevoort. "Copperhead Envenomations: Clinical Profiles of Three Different Subspecies." Veterinary and Human Toxicology, vol. 41, no. 3, 1999, pp. 149-52.
Keyler DE, Vandevoort JT. Copperhead envenomations: clinical profiles of three different subspecies. Vet Hum Toxicol. 1999;41(3):149-52.
Keyler, D. E., & Vandevoort, J. T. (1999). Copperhead envenomations: clinical profiles of three different subspecies. Veterinary and Human Toxicology, 41(3), 149-52.
Keyler DE, Vandevoort JT. Copperhead Envenomations: Clinical Profiles of Three Different Subspecies. Vet Hum Toxicol. 1999;41(3):149-52. PubMed PMID: 10349703.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Copperhead envenomations: clinical profiles of three different subspecies. AU - Keyler,D E, AU - Vandevoort,J T, PY - 1999/6/1/pubmed PY - 1999/6/1/medline PY - 1999/6/1/entrez SP - 149 EP - 52 JF - Veterinary and human toxicology JO - Vet Hum Toxicol VL - 41 IS - 3 N2 - Copperhead envenomation cases reported in the literature frequently lack identification of the subspecies of copperhead responsible for the envenomation. Whether subspecific identity would be useful in predicting possible different toxicity profiles may have clinical relevance. We report here the clinical profiles from envenomations involving 3 different subspecies of captive adult copperhead snakes--the southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix), the northern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen), and the broad-banded copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus). The bites occurred in the north-central region of the US where none of these subspecies are endemic and involved a professional and 2 amateur herpetologists. The victims were adult males with no previous history of venomous snake bite, and all bites were evidenced by fang puncture marks to their index finger or thumb. Envenomations from the broad-banded and northern copperhead subspecies caused localized symptoms of pain, edema and ecchymosis. In addition to these symptoms, southern copperhead envenomation resulted in a more severe clinical toxicity profile as evidenced by propulsive emesis, diarrhea and hematuria. Whether these differences in observed clinical toxicity were the result of unique subspecific venom pharmacological actions is an interesting question. However, independent of the copperhead subspecies involved, conservative medical management was effective in each case. SN - 0145-6296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10349703/Copperhead_envenomations:_clinical_profiles_of_three_different_subspecies_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -