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Analysis of illicit ecstasy tablets: implications for clinical management in the accident and emergency department.
J Accid Emerg Med. 1999 May; 16(3):194-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the composition of illicitly manufactured "ecstasy" tablets sold on the UK drugs market.

METHODS

Analysis by gas chromatography of 25 illicit ecstasy tablets handed in under amnesty to Leeds Addiction Unit.

RESULTS

Illicitly manufactured ecstasy tablets contain a range of ingredients, of widely differing concentrations, and even tablets with the same brand name have variable concentrations of active ingredients. Concentrations of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) more popularly known as ecstasy, varied 70-fold between tablets. Nine tablets contained neither MDMA nor related analogues.

CONCLUSIONS

These results have implications for emergency workers attending to those who have become casualties of the drug ecstasy. Those claiming to have ingested ecstasy may actually have taken other agents that require different clinical management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ethnicity and Health Unit, Faculty of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10353046

Citation

Sherlock, K, et al. "Analysis of Illicit Ecstasy Tablets: Implications for Clinical Management in the Accident and Emergency Department." Journal of Accident & Emergency Medicine, vol. 16, no. 3, 1999, pp. 194-7.
Sherlock K, Wolff K, Hay AW, et al. Analysis of illicit ecstasy tablets: implications for clinical management in the accident and emergency department. J Accid Emerg Med. 1999;16(3):194-7.
Sherlock, K., Wolff, K., Hay, A. W., & Conner, M. (1999). Analysis of illicit ecstasy tablets: implications for clinical management in the accident and emergency department. Journal of Accident & Emergency Medicine, 16(3), 194-7.
Sherlock K, et al. Analysis of Illicit Ecstasy Tablets: Implications for Clinical Management in the Accident and Emergency Department. J Accid Emerg Med. 1999;16(3):194-7. PubMed PMID: 10353046.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analysis of illicit ecstasy tablets: implications for clinical management in the accident and emergency department. AU - Sherlock,K, AU - Wolff,K, AU - Hay,A W, AU - Conner,M, PY - 1999/6/3/pubmed PY - 1999/6/3/medline PY - 1999/6/3/entrez SP - 194 EP - 7 JF - Journal of accident & emergency medicine JO - J Accid Emerg Med VL - 16 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the composition of illicitly manufactured "ecstasy" tablets sold on the UK drugs market. METHODS: Analysis by gas chromatography of 25 illicit ecstasy tablets handed in under amnesty to Leeds Addiction Unit. RESULTS: Illicitly manufactured ecstasy tablets contain a range of ingredients, of widely differing concentrations, and even tablets with the same brand name have variable concentrations of active ingredients. Concentrations of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) more popularly known as ecstasy, varied 70-fold between tablets. Nine tablets contained neither MDMA nor related analogues. CONCLUSIONS: These results have implications for emergency workers attending to those who have become casualties of the drug ecstasy. Those claiming to have ingested ecstasy may actually have taken other agents that require different clinical management. SN - 1351-0622 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10353046/Analysis_of_illicit_ecstasy_tablets:_implications_for_clinical_management_in_the_accident_and_emergency_department_ L2 - http://emj.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10353046 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -