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Differential effects of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids on postprandial lipemia and incretin responses in healthy subjects.
Am J Clin Nutr 1999; 69(6):1135-43AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Elevations of postprandial triacylglycerol-rich plasma lipoproteins and suppressions of HDL-cholesterol concentrations are considered potentially atherogenic. Long-term studies have shown beneficial effects of monounsaturated fatty acids (eg, oleic acid) on fasting lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in humans. A direct stimulatory effect of oleic acid on the secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was shown in animal studies.

OBJECTIVE

We compared the postprandial responses of glucose, insulin, fatty acids, triacylglycerol, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and GLP-1 to test meals rich in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.

DESIGN

Ten young, lean, healthy persons ingested 3 meals: an energy-free soup consumed with 50 g carbohydrate (control meal), the control meal plus 100 g butter, and the control meal plus 80 g olive oil. Triacylglycerol and retinyl palmitate responses were measured in total plasma, in a chylomicron-rich fraction, and in a chylomicron-poor fraction.

RESULTS

No significant differences in glucose, insulin, or fatty acid responses to the 2 fat-rich meals were seen. Plasma triacylglycerol responses were highest after the butter meal, with chylomicron triacylglycerol rising 2.5-5-fold. Retinyl palmitate responses were higher and more prolonged after the butter meal than after the control and olive oil meals, whereas both postprandial HDL-cholesterol concentrations and GLP-1 and GIP responses were higher after the olive oil meal than after the butter meal.

CONCLUSIONS

Olive oil induced lower triacylglycerol concentrations and higher HDL-cholesterol concentrations than butter, without eliciting differences in concentrations of glucose, insulin, or fatty acids. Furthermore, olive oil induced higher concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP than did butter, which may point to a relation between fatty acid composition, incretin responses, and triacylglycerol metabolism in the postprandial phase.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aarhus Amtssygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. claus.thomsen@dadlnet.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10357731

Citation

Thomsen, C, et al. "Differential Effects of Saturated and Monounsaturated Fatty Acids On Postprandial Lipemia and Incretin Responses in Healthy Subjects." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 69, no. 6, 1999, pp. 1135-43.
Thomsen C, Rasmussen O, Lousen T, et al. Differential effects of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids on postprandial lipemia and incretin responses in healthy subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69(6):1135-43.
Thomsen, C., Rasmussen, O., Lousen, T., Holst, J. J., Fenselau, S., Schrezenmeir, J., & Hermansen, K. (1999). Differential effects of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids on postprandial lipemia and incretin responses in healthy subjects. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 69(6), pp. 1135-43.
Thomsen C, et al. Differential Effects of Saturated and Monounsaturated Fatty Acids On Postprandial Lipemia and Incretin Responses in Healthy Subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;69(6):1135-43. PubMed PMID: 10357731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differential effects of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids on postprandial lipemia and incretin responses in healthy subjects. AU - Thomsen,C, AU - Rasmussen,O, AU - Lousen,T, AU - Holst,J J, AU - Fenselau,S, AU - Schrezenmeir,J, AU - Hermansen,K, PY - 1999/6/5/pubmed PY - 1999/6/5/medline PY - 1999/6/5/entrez SP - 1135 EP - 43 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 69 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Elevations of postprandial triacylglycerol-rich plasma lipoproteins and suppressions of HDL-cholesterol concentrations are considered potentially atherogenic. Long-term studies have shown beneficial effects of monounsaturated fatty acids (eg, oleic acid) on fasting lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in humans. A direct stimulatory effect of oleic acid on the secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was shown in animal studies. OBJECTIVE: We compared the postprandial responses of glucose, insulin, fatty acids, triacylglycerol, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and GLP-1 to test meals rich in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. DESIGN: Ten young, lean, healthy persons ingested 3 meals: an energy-free soup consumed with 50 g carbohydrate (control meal), the control meal plus 100 g butter, and the control meal plus 80 g olive oil. Triacylglycerol and retinyl palmitate responses were measured in total plasma, in a chylomicron-rich fraction, and in a chylomicron-poor fraction. RESULTS: No significant differences in glucose, insulin, or fatty acid responses to the 2 fat-rich meals were seen. Plasma triacylglycerol responses were highest after the butter meal, with chylomicron triacylglycerol rising 2.5-5-fold. Retinyl palmitate responses were higher and more prolonged after the butter meal than after the control and olive oil meals, whereas both postprandial HDL-cholesterol concentrations and GLP-1 and GIP responses were higher after the olive oil meal than after the butter meal. CONCLUSIONS: Olive oil induced lower triacylglycerol concentrations and higher HDL-cholesterol concentrations than butter, without eliciting differences in concentrations of glucose, insulin, or fatty acids. Furthermore, olive oil induced higher concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP than did butter, which may point to a relation between fatty acid composition, incretin responses, and triacylglycerol metabolism in the postprandial phase. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10357731/Differential_effects_of_saturated_and_monounsaturated_fatty_acids_on_postprandial_lipemia_and_incretin_responses_in_healthy_subjects_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/69.6.1135 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -