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Transcutaneous electrogastrography: a non-invasive method to evaluate post-operative gastric disorders?
Hepatogastroenterology. 1999 Mar-Apr; 46(26):1244-8.H

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

With the development of high-performance computer programs, transcutaneous electrogastrography has experienced a renaissance in the last few years and is widely recommended as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to evaluate functional gastric disorders. We assessed the clinical value of electrogastrography in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients after a variety of procedures of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

METHODOLOGY

Electrogastrography tracings were recorded with a commercially available data logger using a recording frequency of 4 Hz. A standard meal was given between a 60 min preprandial and a 60 min postprandial period. The following parameters were analyzed pre- and postprandially utilizing Fourier and spectral analysis: Regular gastric activity (2-4 cycles/minute), bradygastria (0.5-2 cycles/minute), tachygastria (4-9 cycles/minute), dominant frequency and power of the dominant frequency. Nineteen asymptomatic healthy volunteers served as a control group. Forty-nine patients, who had undergone upper intestinal surgery, were included in the study (cholecystectomy n = 10, Nissen fundoplication n = 10, subtotal gastrectomy n = 8, truncal vagotomy, and gastric pull-up as esophageal replacement n = 6). Twenty of these patients complained of epigastric symptoms post-operatively, while 12 of these 20 patients also had a scintigraphic gastric emptying study with Tc99m labeled semisolid meal.

RESULTS

Preprandial gastric electric activity was between 2 and 4 cycles/minute in 60-90% of the study time in healthy volunteers. In all study groups the prevalence and power of normal electric activity increased significantly after the test meal (p < 0.001). After cholecystectomy, Nissen fundoplication, subtotal gastrectomy or vagotomy and gastric pull-up pre- and postprandial gastric electric activity showed a greater variability compared to normal volunteers (p < 0.05), but no typical electrogastrography pattern could be identified for the different surgical procedures. There was no significant difference in the electrogastrography pattern between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients and patients with normal or abnormal scintigraphic gastric emptying curves.

CONCLUSIONS

There is no specific electrogastrography pattern to differentiate between typical surgical procedures or epigastric symptoms. To date, electrogastrography does not contribute to the diagnosis and analysis of gastric motility disorders after upper intestinal surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar der TU Munchen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10370700

Citation

Kauer, W K., et al. "Transcutaneous Electrogastrography: a Non-invasive Method to Evaluate Post-operative Gastric Disorders?" Hepato-gastroenterology, vol. 46, no. 26, 1999, pp. 1244-8.
Kauer WK, Stein HJ, Balint A, et al. Transcutaneous electrogastrography: a non-invasive method to evaluate post-operative gastric disorders? Hepatogastroenterology. 1999;46(26):1244-8.
Kauer, W. K., Stein, H. J., Balint, A., & Siewert, J. R. (1999). Transcutaneous electrogastrography: a non-invasive method to evaluate post-operative gastric disorders? Hepato-gastroenterology, 46(26), 1244-8.
Kauer WK, et al. Transcutaneous Electrogastrography: a Non-invasive Method to Evaluate Post-operative Gastric Disorders. Hepatogastroenterology. 1999 Mar-Apr;46(26):1244-8. PubMed PMID: 10370700.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transcutaneous electrogastrography: a non-invasive method to evaluate post-operative gastric disorders? AU - Kauer,W K, AU - Stein,H J, AU - Balint,A, AU - Siewert,J R, PY - 1999/6/17/pubmed PY - 1999/6/17/medline PY - 1999/6/17/entrez SP - 1244 EP - 8 JF - Hepato-gastroenterology JO - Hepatogastroenterology VL - 46 IS - 26 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: With the development of high-performance computer programs, transcutaneous electrogastrography has experienced a renaissance in the last few years and is widely recommended as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to evaluate functional gastric disorders. We assessed the clinical value of electrogastrography in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients after a variety of procedures of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. METHODOLOGY: Electrogastrography tracings were recorded with a commercially available data logger using a recording frequency of 4 Hz. A standard meal was given between a 60 min preprandial and a 60 min postprandial period. The following parameters were analyzed pre- and postprandially utilizing Fourier and spectral analysis: Regular gastric activity (2-4 cycles/minute), bradygastria (0.5-2 cycles/minute), tachygastria (4-9 cycles/minute), dominant frequency and power of the dominant frequency. Nineteen asymptomatic healthy volunteers served as a control group. Forty-nine patients, who had undergone upper intestinal surgery, were included in the study (cholecystectomy n = 10, Nissen fundoplication n = 10, subtotal gastrectomy n = 8, truncal vagotomy, and gastric pull-up as esophageal replacement n = 6). Twenty of these patients complained of epigastric symptoms post-operatively, while 12 of these 20 patients also had a scintigraphic gastric emptying study with Tc99m labeled semisolid meal. RESULTS: Preprandial gastric electric activity was between 2 and 4 cycles/minute in 60-90% of the study time in healthy volunteers. In all study groups the prevalence and power of normal electric activity increased significantly after the test meal (p < 0.001). After cholecystectomy, Nissen fundoplication, subtotal gastrectomy or vagotomy and gastric pull-up pre- and postprandial gastric electric activity showed a greater variability compared to normal volunteers (p < 0.05), but no typical electrogastrography pattern could be identified for the different surgical procedures. There was no significant difference in the electrogastrography pattern between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients and patients with normal or abnormal scintigraphic gastric emptying curves. CONCLUSIONS: There is no specific electrogastrography pattern to differentiate between typical surgical procedures or epigastric symptoms. To date, electrogastrography does not contribute to the diagnosis and analysis of gastric motility disorders after upper intestinal surgery. SN - 0172-6390 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10370700/Transcutaneous_electrogastrography:_a_non_invasive_method_to_evaluate_post_operative_gastric_disorders DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -