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Neuroendocrine responses to psychological workload of instrument flying in student pilots.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999 Jun; 70(6):565-70.AS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Information processing and stress tolerance are necessary features for instrument flying (IFR), especially among student pilots. Psychological workload of IFR flight may lead to stress reactions such as neuroendocrine activity.

METHODS

Neuroendocrine responses to an IFR flight with Vinka piston-engined primary trainer were studied in 35 male volunteers who participated in the basic military flying course of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). The student pilots performed a 40-min IFR flight mission and a control session on land in randomized order between 11.00 h and 15.00 h. The IFR flight included 3 NDB approaches and was evaluated by flight instructors. Blood samples were collected 15 min before, 5 min and 60 min after the flight as well as control session, and. Plasma ACTH, beta3-endorphin (BE), cortisol, prolactin, adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) were measured. Psychological evaluations included psychomotor test (Wiener), Multi Coordination and Attention Test, ability tests and personality tests (CMPS and 16 PF). The overall psychological evaluation was made by an aviation psychologist.

RESULTS

Plasma ACTH was significantly higher before and 5 min after the flight compared with control levels, but plasma BE increased significantly only before the flight. Plasma cortisol was significantly elevated before and 5 min after the flight. Plasma prolactin, NA and A increases were significant 5 min after the flight. High A levels after the flight correlated significantly with poor IFR flight performance as well as with poor psychomotor test results.

CONCLUSIONS

The plasma prolactin and NA increases after the flight represented a direct type of stress reaction to the flight situation. The plasma BE response to IFR flight was an anticipatory stress reaction, but plasma ACTH, cortisol and A responses included both anticipatory and direct types of stress reactions. Psychological factors, flight performance and neuroendocrine responses to IFR flight appear to be associated with each other. Therefore, neuroendocrine reactions as a response to the psychological workload of military flying could be used for identifying stress tolerance in military pilots.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10373047

Citation

Leino, T K., et al. "Neuroendocrine Responses to Psychological Workload of Instrument Flying in Student Pilots." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 70, no. 6, 1999, pp. 565-70.
Leino TK, Leppäluoto J, Ruokonen A, et al. Neuroendocrine responses to psychological workload of instrument flying in student pilots. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999;70(6):565-70.
Leino, T. K., Leppäluoto, J., Ruokonen, A., & Kuronen, P. (1999). Neuroendocrine responses to psychological workload of instrument flying in student pilots. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 70(6), 565-70.
Leino TK, et al. Neuroendocrine Responses to Psychological Workload of Instrument Flying in Student Pilots. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999;70(6):565-70. PubMed PMID: 10373047.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuroendocrine responses to psychological workload of instrument flying in student pilots. AU - Leino,T K, AU - Leppäluoto,J, AU - Ruokonen,A, AU - Kuronen,P, PY - 1999/6/18/pubmed PY - 1999/6/18/medline PY - 1999/6/18/entrez SP - 565 EP - 70 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 70 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Information processing and stress tolerance are necessary features for instrument flying (IFR), especially among student pilots. Psychological workload of IFR flight may lead to stress reactions such as neuroendocrine activity. METHODS: Neuroendocrine responses to an IFR flight with Vinka piston-engined primary trainer were studied in 35 male volunteers who participated in the basic military flying course of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). The student pilots performed a 40-min IFR flight mission and a control session on land in randomized order between 11.00 h and 15.00 h. The IFR flight included 3 NDB approaches and was evaluated by flight instructors. Blood samples were collected 15 min before, 5 min and 60 min after the flight as well as control session, and. Plasma ACTH, beta3-endorphin (BE), cortisol, prolactin, adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) were measured. Psychological evaluations included psychomotor test (Wiener), Multi Coordination and Attention Test, ability tests and personality tests (CMPS and 16 PF). The overall psychological evaluation was made by an aviation psychologist. RESULTS: Plasma ACTH was significantly higher before and 5 min after the flight compared with control levels, but plasma BE increased significantly only before the flight. Plasma cortisol was significantly elevated before and 5 min after the flight. Plasma prolactin, NA and A increases were significant 5 min after the flight. High A levels after the flight correlated significantly with poor IFR flight performance as well as with poor psychomotor test results. CONCLUSIONS: The plasma prolactin and NA increases after the flight represented a direct type of stress reaction to the flight situation. The plasma BE response to IFR flight was an anticipatory stress reaction, but plasma ACTH, cortisol and A responses included both anticipatory and direct types of stress reactions. Psychological factors, flight performance and neuroendocrine responses to IFR flight appear to be associated with each other. Therefore, neuroendocrine reactions as a response to the psychological workload of military flying could be used for identifying stress tolerance in military pilots. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10373047/Neuroendocrine_responses_to_psychological_workload_of_instrument_flying_in_student_pilots_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/veteransandmilitaryhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -