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Neuroendocrine responses and psychomotor test results in subjects participating in military pilot selection.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999 Jun; 70(6):571-6.AS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Military flying sets high demands on the mental performance and stress tolerance of pilots. Neuroendocrine responses could be a method for evaluating stress tolerance.

METHODS

Psychological workload and neuroendocrine responses associated with the psychomotor Wiener's test were studied in 80 male volunteers. These personnel had applied for the basic military flying program of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). After the first blood sample at 0930 h, the subjects were randomly assigned to test (n = 40) and control groups (n = 40). The test group performed the psychomotor test, which lasted 10 min. The second blood sample was collected 1 min after the test. The control group was clinically examined and the blood sample was taken in the same way.

RESULTS

A high plasma ACTH level before the psychomotor test predicted (r = 0.36, p = 0.02) a poor overall result in the psychomotor test. After the psychomotor test, plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and beta-endorphin levels were significantly higher than before the test. They were also higher than in the control group. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels increased after the psychomotor test, but the increase was not statistically significant. High ACTH, cortisol and prolactin increments were specific to a high amount of delayed (over 2 s) psychomotor responses, as a marker of information overload.

CONCLUSIONS

Elevated plasma ACTH, cortisol and prolactin levels, after the psychomotor test, were associated with a high amount of the delayed responses. This indicates that high neuroendocrine responses were connected with problems in stress tolerance during information processing. High neuroendocrine reactions under information load could, therefore, be used for identification of lowered stress tolerance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10373048

Citation

Leino, T K., et al. "Neuroendocrine Responses and Psychomotor Test Results in Subjects Participating in Military Pilot Selection." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 70, no. 6, 1999, pp. 571-6.
Leino TK, Leppäluoto J, Ruokonen A, et al. Neuroendocrine responses and psychomotor test results in subjects participating in military pilot selection. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999;70(6):571-6.
Leino, T. K., Leppäluoto, J., Ruokonen, A., & Kuronen, P. (1999). Neuroendocrine responses and psychomotor test results in subjects participating in military pilot selection. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 70(6), 571-6.
Leino TK, et al. Neuroendocrine Responses and Psychomotor Test Results in Subjects Participating in Military Pilot Selection. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1999;70(6):571-6. PubMed PMID: 10373048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuroendocrine responses and psychomotor test results in subjects participating in military pilot selection. AU - Leino,T K, AU - Leppäluoto,J, AU - Ruokonen,A, AU - Kuronen,P, PY - 1999/6/18/pubmed PY - 1999/6/18/medline PY - 1999/6/18/entrez SP - 571 EP - 6 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 70 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Military flying sets high demands on the mental performance and stress tolerance of pilots. Neuroendocrine responses could be a method for evaluating stress tolerance. METHODS: Psychological workload and neuroendocrine responses associated with the psychomotor Wiener's test were studied in 80 male volunteers. These personnel had applied for the basic military flying program of the Finnish Air Force (FAF). After the first blood sample at 0930 h, the subjects were randomly assigned to test (n = 40) and control groups (n = 40). The test group performed the psychomotor test, which lasted 10 min. The second blood sample was collected 1 min after the test. The control group was clinically examined and the blood sample was taken in the same way. RESULTS: A high plasma ACTH level before the psychomotor test predicted (r = 0.36, p = 0.02) a poor overall result in the psychomotor test. After the psychomotor test, plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and beta-endorphin levels were significantly higher than before the test. They were also higher than in the control group. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels increased after the psychomotor test, but the increase was not statistically significant. High ACTH, cortisol and prolactin increments were specific to a high amount of delayed (over 2 s) psychomotor responses, as a marker of information overload. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated plasma ACTH, cortisol and prolactin levels, after the psychomotor test, were associated with a high amount of the delayed responses. This indicates that high neuroendocrine responses were connected with problems in stress tolerance during information processing. High neuroendocrine reactions under information load could, therefore, be used for identification of lowered stress tolerance. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10373048/Neuroendocrine_responses_and_psychomotor_test_results_in_subjects_participating_in_military_pilot_selection_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/veteransandmilitaryhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -