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Quantitation of vital bleaching by computer analysis of photographic images.
J Am Dent Assoc. 1999 Jun; 130(6):809-16.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The authors investigated the use of computer processing of photographic images to monitor changes in tooth brightness after nightguard vital bleaching, or NGVB.

METHODS

Photographs of shade guides and clinical cases (patients' teeth) were taken on 35-millimeter film with electronic flash illumination and processed commercially. A slide scanner was used to digitize images as red, green and blue, or RGB, files, with constant brightness, contrast and linearity settings; the images were then analyzed with commercial software. Relevant image components (that is, teeth or shade guide tabs) were separated, and histograms of various numerical color descriptors were generated for each image component.

RESULTS

Analysis of shade tab images showed that the mean pixel intensity for the RGB blue channel, or MPIb, was the most satisfactory brightness descriptor, with clear sequential MPIb increments from lighter to darker shades in each series of colors (A through D) and close correlation with the manufacturer's brightness scale (r = .83). Mathematical analysis of MPIb data for shade tabs in the same image yielded a brightness index that was reproducible and correlated well with the manufacturer's brightness scale. Sequential measurements of this index in three subjects whose teeth were bleached with carbamide peroxide for 14 days correlated well with assessments made by visual shade guide comparisons.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors conclude that computer analysis of digitized photographic images with internal color controls provides an index of tooth brightness that is reproducible from image to image.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

A brightness index derived from computer analysis of digitized photographic images may be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of NGVB.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Diagnostic Sciences and General Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry 27599-7450, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10377638

Citation

Bentley, C, et al. "Quantitation of Vital Bleaching By Computer Analysis of Photographic Images." Journal of the American Dental Association (1939), vol. 130, no. 6, 1999, pp. 809-16.
Bentley C, Leonard RH, Nelson CF, et al. Quantitation of vital bleaching by computer analysis of photographic images. J Am Dent Assoc. 1999;130(6):809-16.
Bentley, C., Leonard, R. H., Nelson, C. F., & Bentley, S. A. (1999). Quantitation of vital bleaching by computer analysis of photographic images. Journal of the American Dental Association (1939), 130(6), 809-16.
Bentley C, et al. Quantitation of Vital Bleaching By Computer Analysis of Photographic Images. J Am Dent Assoc. 1999;130(6):809-16. PubMed PMID: 10377638.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quantitation of vital bleaching by computer analysis of photographic images. AU - Bentley,C, AU - Leonard,R H, AU - Nelson,C F, AU - Bentley,S A, PY - 1999/6/23/pubmed PY - 1999/6/23/medline PY - 1999/6/23/entrez SP - 809 EP - 16 JF - Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) JO - J Am Dent Assoc VL - 130 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The authors investigated the use of computer processing of photographic images to monitor changes in tooth brightness after nightguard vital bleaching, or NGVB. METHODS: Photographs of shade guides and clinical cases (patients' teeth) were taken on 35-millimeter film with electronic flash illumination and processed commercially. A slide scanner was used to digitize images as red, green and blue, or RGB, files, with constant brightness, contrast and linearity settings; the images were then analyzed with commercial software. Relevant image components (that is, teeth or shade guide tabs) were separated, and histograms of various numerical color descriptors were generated for each image component. RESULTS: Analysis of shade tab images showed that the mean pixel intensity for the RGB blue channel, or MPIb, was the most satisfactory brightness descriptor, with clear sequential MPIb increments from lighter to darker shades in each series of colors (A through D) and close correlation with the manufacturer's brightness scale (r = .83). Mathematical analysis of MPIb data for shade tabs in the same image yielded a brightness index that was reproducible and correlated well with the manufacturer's brightness scale. Sequential measurements of this index in three subjects whose teeth were bleached with carbamide peroxide for 14 days correlated well with assessments made by visual shade guide comparisons. CONCLUSIONS: The authors conclude that computer analysis of digitized photographic images with internal color controls provides an index of tooth brightness that is reproducible from image to image. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: A brightness index derived from computer analysis of digitized photographic images may be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of NGVB. SN - 0002-8177 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10377638/Quantitation_of_vital_bleaching_by_computer_analysis_of_photographic_images_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -