Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effects of different forms of dietary hydrogenated fats on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels.
N Engl J Med 1999; 340(25):1933-40NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Metabolic studies suggest that fatty acids containing at least one double bond in the trans configuration, which are found in hydrogenated fat, have a detrimental effect on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels as compared with unsaturated fatty acids containing double bonds only in the cis configuration. We compared the effects of diets with a broad range of trans fatty acids on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

METHODS

Eighteen women and 18 men consumed each of six diets in random order for 35-day periods. The foods were identical in each diet, and each diet provided 30 percent of calories as fat, with two thirds of the fat contributed as soybean oil (<0.5 g of trans fatty acid per 100 g of fat), semiliquid margarine (<0.5 g per 100 g), soft margarine (7.4 g per 100 g), shortening (9.9 g per 100 g), or stick margarine (20.1 g per 100 g). The effects of those diets on serum lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein levels were compared with those of a diet enriched with butter, which has a high content of saturated fat.

RESULTS

The mean (+/-SD) serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level was 177+/-32 mg per deciliter (4.58+/-0.85 mmol per liter) and the mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level was 45+/-10 mg per deciliter (1.2+/-0.26 mmol per liter) after subjects consumed the butter-enriched diet. The LDL cholesterol level was reduced on average by 12 percent, 11 percent, 9 percent, 7 percent, and 5 percent, respectively, after subjects consumed the diets enriched with soybean oil, semiliquid margarine, soft margarine, shortening, and stick margarine; the HDL cholesterol level was reduced by 3 percent, 4 percent, 4 percent, 4 percent, and 6 percent, respectively. Ratios of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol were lowest after the consumption of the soybean-oil diet and semiliquid-margarine diet and highest after the stick-margarine diet.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that the consumption of products that are low in trans fatty acids and saturated fat has beneficial effects on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA. lichtenstvli@hnrc.tufts.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10379016

Citation

Lichtenstein, A H., et al. "Effects of Different Forms of Dietary Hydrogenated Fats On Serum Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 340, no. 25, 1999, pp. 1933-40.
Lichtenstein AH, Ausman LM, Jalbert SM, et al. Effects of different forms of dietary hydrogenated fats on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels. N Engl J Med. 1999;340(25):1933-40.
Lichtenstein, A. H., Ausman, L. M., Jalbert, S. M., & Schaefer, E. J. (1999). Effects of different forms of dietary hydrogenated fats on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The New England Journal of Medicine, 340(25), pp. 1933-40.
Lichtenstein AH, et al. Effects of Different Forms of Dietary Hydrogenated Fats On Serum Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels. N Engl J Med. 1999 Jun 24;340(25):1933-40. PubMed PMID: 10379016.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of different forms of dietary hydrogenated fats on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels. AU - Lichtenstein,A H, AU - Ausman,L M, AU - Jalbert,S M, AU - Schaefer,E J, PY - 1999/6/24/pubmed PY - 1999/6/24/medline PY - 1999/6/24/entrez SP - 1933 EP - 40 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 340 IS - 25 N2 - BACKGROUND: Metabolic studies suggest that fatty acids containing at least one double bond in the trans configuration, which are found in hydrogenated fat, have a detrimental effect on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels as compared with unsaturated fatty acids containing double bonds only in the cis configuration. We compared the effects of diets with a broad range of trans fatty acids on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels. METHODS: Eighteen women and 18 men consumed each of six diets in random order for 35-day periods. The foods were identical in each diet, and each diet provided 30 percent of calories as fat, with two thirds of the fat contributed as soybean oil (<0.5 g of trans fatty acid per 100 g of fat), semiliquid margarine (<0.5 g per 100 g), soft margarine (7.4 g per 100 g), shortening (9.9 g per 100 g), or stick margarine (20.1 g per 100 g). The effects of those diets on serum lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein levels were compared with those of a diet enriched with butter, which has a high content of saturated fat. RESULTS: The mean (+/-SD) serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level was 177+/-32 mg per deciliter (4.58+/-0.85 mmol per liter) and the mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level was 45+/-10 mg per deciliter (1.2+/-0.26 mmol per liter) after subjects consumed the butter-enriched diet. The LDL cholesterol level was reduced on average by 12 percent, 11 percent, 9 percent, 7 percent, and 5 percent, respectively, after subjects consumed the diets enriched with soybean oil, semiliquid margarine, soft margarine, shortening, and stick margarine; the HDL cholesterol level was reduced by 3 percent, 4 percent, 4 percent, 4 percent, and 6 percent, respectively. Ratios of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol were lowest after the consumption of the soybean-oil diet and semiliquid-margarine diet and highest after the stick-margarine diet. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that the consumption of products that are low in trans fatty acids and saturated fat has beneficial effects on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels. SN - 0028-4793 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10379016/Effects_of_different_forms_of_dietary_hydrogenated_fats_on_serum_lipoprotein_cholesterol_levels_ L2 - http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199906243402501?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -