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Promoting successful breast feeding among women with a low income.
Midwifery 1998; 14(2):94-100M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify those factors which promote or discourage successful breast feeding in a sample of women with a low income.

DESIGN

Qualitative research using in-depth, semi-structured interviews.

SAMPLE

All women with a low income who were identified as having breast fed their latest baby at least once and who had delivered at a district general hospital in the south west of England from 17 September 1996 to 5 February 1997.

FINDINGS

Three behavioural areas which determined whether or not women with a low income continued to breast feed were identified: individual and social environmental, baby and midwifery practice factors. In terms of individual and social environmental factors those women who continued to breast feed were more likely to have: positive attitudes; realistic expectations; greater levels of self-esteem; a supportive mother/friend; a partner who was not against breast feeding; and the ability to cope with the perceived temporary social isolation. In terms of baby factors those women who continued to breast feed had babies who were more likely to: have three- or four-hourly feeds; be perceived as a contented baby; and have gained weight. And finally, in terms of midwifery practice factors, those women who continued to breast feed were more likely to have: not been separated from their baby; not been given supplementary or complementary feeds; received good advice, especially with regard to positioning the baby at the breast; had greater continuity of midwifery input; had sufficient quality time with a midwife; and had the opportunity to solve problems with a community midwife's help.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Midwifery practice can be improved to promote successful breast feeding among women with a low income by: 1) creating realistic expectations and increasing women's confidence/desire to succeed in breast feeding; 2) providing good quality advice and support to mothers of newborn babies, particularly with regard to positioning the baby at the breast; 3) improving social-support networks available to breast-feeding mothers, perhaps through educating grandmothers (or partners) in breast-feeding matters.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10382477

Citation

Whelan, A, and P Lupton. "Promoting Successful Breast Feeding Among Women With a Low Income." Midwifery, vol. 14, no. 2, 1998, pp. 94-100.
Whelan A, Lupton P. Promoting successful breast feeding among women with a low income. Midwifery. 1998;14(2):94-100.
Whelan, A., & Lupton, P. (1998). Promoting successful breast feeding among women with a low income. Midwifery, 14(2), pp. 94-100.
Whelan A, Lupton P. Promoting Successful Breast Feeding Among Women With a Low Income. Midwifery. 1998;14(2):94-100. PubMed PMID: 10382477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Promoting successful breast feeding among women with a low income. AU - Whelan,A, AU - Lupton,P, PY - 1999/6/26/pubmed PY - 1999/6/26/medline PY - 1999/6/26/entrez SP - 94 EP - 100 JF - Midwifery JO - Midwifery VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify those factors which promote or discourage successful breast feeding in a sample of women with a low income. DESIGN: Qualitative research using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. SAMPLE: All women with a low income who were identified as having breast fed their latest baby at least once and who had delivered at a district general hospital in the south west of England from 17 September 1996 to 5 February 1997. FINDINGS: Three behavioural areas which determined whether or not women with a low income continued to breast feed were identified: individual and social environmental, baby and midwifery practice factors. In terms of individual and social environmental factors those women who continued to breast feed were more likely to have: positive attitudes; realistic expectations; greater levels of self-esteem; a supportive mother/friend; a partner who was not against breast feeding; and the ability to cope with the perceived temporary social isolation. In terms of baby factors those women who continued to breast feed had babies who were more likely to: have three- or four-hourly feeds; be perceived as a contented baby; and have gained weight. And finally, in terms of midwifery practice factors, those women who continued to breast feed were more likely to have: not been separated from their baby; not been given supplementary or complementary feeds; received good advice, especially with regard to positioning the baby at the breast; had greater continuity of midwifery input; had sufficient quality time with a midwife; and had the opportunity to solve problems with a community midwife's help. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Midwifery practice can be improved to promote successful breast feeding among women with a low income by: 1) creating realistic expectations and increasing women's confidence/desire to succeed in breast feeding; 2) providing good quality advice and support to mothers of newborn babies, particularly with regard to positioning the baby at the breast; 3) improving social-support networks available to breast-feeding mothers, perhaps through educating grandmothers (or partners) in breast-feeding matters. SN - 0266-6138 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10382477/Promoting_successful_breast_feeding_among_women_with_a_low_income_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/breastfeeding.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -