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Mucosal immunity in extrinsic allergic alveolitis: salivary immunoglobulins and antibody against inhaled avian antigens among pigeon breeders.
Clin Exp Allergy. 1999 Jul; 29(7):957-64.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Inhaled antigens from pigeons can cause extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA); a model disease of pulmonary inflammation. Among pigeon breeders, serum antibody and sensitized lymphocytes specific for these antigens have been described primarily, but not always, with disease. Antibody activity within the lung may have a closer association with disease, however, sampling by alveolar lavage at bronchoscopy is impractical for screening, therefore we used saliva to quantify the mucosal antibody response.

OBJECTIVE

To establish: (a) if antibody activity against inhaled avian antigens was detectable in the saliva of pigeon breeders, (b) if the distribution of saliva antibody and total immunoglobulin levels were quantitatively or qualitatively different from serum, and (c) whether the hypersensitivity symptoms of EAA were associated more with the mucosal or the systemic humoral immune response.

MEASURES

Saliva and serum total and avian antigen-specific IgG, IgA (IgA1 and IgA2) antibody activity in 87 pigeon breeders and 24 control subjects with no avian exposure. Albumin levels were used as a protein reference and cotinine levels confirmed smoking status. Specific hypersensitivity symptoms and various exposure indices to pigeons were established by interview.

RESULTS

Absolute levels and relative proportions (vs albumin) of IgG, IgA and IgA1 in saliva, and IgG in serum, were significantly higher in pigeon breeders compared with controls, suggesting mucosal inflammation. Avian antigen-specific antibody of all isotypes was readily demonstrable in saliva (predominantly IgA) and serum (predominantly IgG) from pigeon breeders, and there were no significant titres in controls. The levels of IgG antibody in saliva and in serum correlated significantly (r = 0.52, P < 0.001), and both correlated with the raised immunoglobulin levels. In both saliva and serum the IgG rather than the IgA antibody activity was associated with symptoms of EAA.

CONCLUSIONS

Antibody activity in saliva and serum, representing the mucosal and systemic responses, respectively, were both strongly stimulated by inhaled antigens. The IgG antibody titres of saliva and serum correlated significantly and were a useful index of inflammation, as measured by the raised total immunoglobulin levels, and symptoms. This suggests that IgG antibody in serum may reflect clinical and immunological sensitization of the lung mucosa. Collecting saliva is noninvasive, and saliva antibody measurement is a convenient method for monitoring EAA, especially in children, and will facilitate sampling for example in epidemiological studies of antibody prevalence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Immunology, Western Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10383597

Citation

McSharry, C, et al. "Mucosal Immunity in Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis: Salivary Immunoglobulins and Antibody Against Inhaled Avian Antigens Among Pigeon Breeders." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 29, no. 7, 1999, pp. 957-64.
McSharry C, MacLeod K, McGregor S, et al. Mucosal immunity in extrinsic allergic alveolitis: salivary immunoglobulins and antibody against inhaled avian antigens among pigeon breeders. Clin Exp Allergy. 1999;29(7):957-64.
McSharry, C., MacLeod, K., McGregor, S., Speekenbrink, A. B., Sriram, S., Boyd, F., & Boyd, G. (1999). Mucosal immunity in extrinsic allergic alveolitis: salivary immunoglobulins and antibody against inhaled avian antigens among pigeon breeders. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 29(7), 957-64.
McSharry C, et al. Mucosal Immunity in Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis: Salivary Immunoglobulins and Antibody Against Inhaled Avian Antigens Among Pigeon Breeders. Clin Exp Allergy. 1999;29(7):957-64. PubMed PMID: 10383597.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mucosal immunity in extrinsic allergic alveolitis: salivary immunoglobulins and antibody against inhaled avian antigens among pigeon breeders. AU - McSharry,C, AU - MacLeod,K, AU - McGregor,S, AU - Speekenbrink,A B, AU - Sriram,S, AU - Boyd,F, AU - Boyd,G, PY - 1999/6/26/pubmed PY - 1999/6/26/medline PY - 1999/6/26/entrez SP - 957 EP - 64 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin Exp Allergy VL - 29 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Inhaled antigens from pigeons can cause extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA); a model disease of pulmonary inflammation. Among pigeon breeders, serum antibody and sensitized lymphocytes specific for these antigens have been described primarily, but not always, with disease. Antibody activity within the lung may have a closer association with disease, however, sampling by alveolar lavage at bronchoscopy is impractical for screening, therefore we used saliva to quantify the mucosal antibody response. OBJECTIVE: To establish: (a) if antibody activity against inhaled avian antigens was detectable in the saliva of pigeon breeders, (b) if the distribution of saliva antibody and total immunoglobulin levels were quantitatively or qualitatively different from serum, and (c) whether the hypersensitivity symptoms of EAA were associated more with the mucosal or the systemic humoral immune response. MEASURES: Saliva and serum total and avian antigen-specific IgG, IgA (IgA1 and IgA2) antibody activity in 87 pigeon breeders and 24 control subjects with no avian exposure. Albumin levels were used as a protein reference and cotinine levels confirmed smoking status. Specific hypersensitivity symptoms and various exposure indices to pigeons were established by interview. RESULTS: Absolute levels and relative proportions (vs albumin) of IgG, IgA and IgA1 in saliva, and IgG in serum, were significantly higher in pigeon breeders compared with controls, suggesting mucosal inflammation. Avian antigen-specific antibody of all isotypes was readily demonstrable in saliva (predominantly IgA) and serum (predominantly IgG) from pigeon breeders, and there were no significant titres in controls. The levels of IgG antibody in saliva and in serum correlated significantly (r = 0.52, P < 0.001), and both correlated with the raised immunoglobulin levels. In both saliva and serum the IgG rather than the IgA antibody activity was associated with symptoms of EAA. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody activity in saliva and serum, representing the mucosal and systemic responses, respectively, were both strongly stimulated by inhaled antigens. The IgG antibody titres of saliva and serum correlated significantly and were a useful index of inflammation, as measured by the raised total immunoglobulin levels, and symptoms. This suggests that IgG antibody in serum may reflect clinical and immunological sensitization of the lung mucosa. Collecting saliva is noninvasive, and saliva antibody measurement is a convenient method for monitoring EAA, especially in children, and will facilitate sampling for example in epidemiological studies of antibody prevalence. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10383597/Mucosal_immunity_in_extrinsic_allergic_alveolitis:_salivary_immunoglobulins_and_antibody_against_inhaled_avian_antigens_among_pigeon_breeders_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0954-7894&amp;date=1999&amp;volume=29&amp;issue=7&amp;spage=957 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -