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The effect of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene supplementation on colorectal adenomas in middle-aged male smokers.

Abstract

Epidemiological and experimental studies have indicated that dietary factors such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene are associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. This study was carried out within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study), whose participants were randomly assigned to four supplementation groups: (a) alpha-tocopherol (AT), 50 mg/day; (b) beta-carotene (BC), 20 mg/day; (c) both AT and BC; and (d) placebo. We included the 15,538 ATBC Study participants who had been randomized within the areas of three major cities in southern Finland. Cases of colorectal adenoma (n = 146) were identified by the pathology laboratories in the study areas, and these participants' medical records were collected and reviewed. Alpha-tocopherol supplementation increased the risk for adenomas (relative risk, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.32), whereas beta-carotene supplementation had no effect on the risk (relative risk, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.35). Slightly more prediagnosis rectal bleeding and intestinal pain occurred in those adenoma cases who received alpha-tocopherol supplements than in those who did not. Thus, some bias may have resulted, with alpha-tocopherol supplementation leading to more colonoscopies and, thus, to an increased detection of incident polyps in this group. This is further supported by the trial finding that alpha-tocopherol supplementation did not increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10385137

Citation

Malila, N, et al. "The Effect of Alpha-tocopherol and Beta-carotene Supplementation On Colorectal Adenomas in Middle-aged Male Smokers." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 8, no. 6, 1999, pp. 489-93.
Malila N, Virtamo J, Virtanen M, et al. The effect of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene supplementation on colorectal adenomas in middle-aged male smokers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(6):489-93.
Malila, N., Virtamo, J., Virtanen, M., Albanes, D., Tangrea, J. A., & Huttunen, J. K. (1999). The effect of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene supplementation on colorectal adenomas in middle-aged male smokers. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 8(6), pp. 489-93.
Malila N, et al. The Effect of Alpha-tocopherol and Beta-carotene Supplementation On Colorectal Adenomas in Middle-aged Male Smokers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8(6):489-93. PubMed PMID: 10385137.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene supplementation on colorectal adenomas in middle-aged male smokers. AU - Malila,N, AU - Virtamo,J, AU - Virtanen,M, AU - Albanes,D, AU - Tangrea,J A, AU - Huttunen,J K, PY - 1999/6/29/pubmed PY - 1999/6/29/medline PY - 1999/6/29/entrez SP - 489 EP - 93 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 8 IS - 6 N2 - Epidemiological and experimental studies have indicated that dietary factors such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene are associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. This study was carried out within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study), whose participants were randomly assigned to four supplementation groups: (a) alpha-tocopherol (AT), 50 mg/day; (b) beta-carotene (BC), 20 mg/day; (c) both AT and BC; and (d) placebo. We included the 15,538 ATBC Study participants who had been randomized within the areas of three major cities in southern Finland. Cases of colorectal adenoma (n = 146) were identified by the pathology laboratories in the study areas, and these participants' medical records were collected and reviewed. Alpha-tocopherol supplementation increased the risk for adenomas (relative risk, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.32), whereas beta-carotene supplementation had no effect on the risk (relative risk, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.35). Slightly more prediagnosis rectal bleeding and intestinal pain occurred in those adenoma cases who received alpha-tocopherol supplements than in those who did not. Thus, some bias may have resulted, with alpha-tocopherol supplementation leading to more colonoscopies and, thus, to an increased detection of incident polyps in this group. This is further supported by the trial finding that alpha-tocopherol supplementation did not increase the risk of colorectal cancer. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10385137/The_effect_of_alpha_tocopherol_and_beta_carotene_supplementation_on_colorectal_adenomas_in_middle_aged_male_smokers_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10385137 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -