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Colorectal cancer: risk factors and recommendations for early detection.

Abstract

Spurred by mounting evidence that the detection and treatment of early-stage colorectal cancers and adenomatous polyps can reduce mortality, Medicare and some other payors recently authorized reimbursement for colorectal cancer screening in persons at average risk for this malignancy. A collaborative group of experts convened by the U.S. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research has recommended screening for average-risk persons over the age of 50 years using one of the following techniques: fecal occult blood testing each year, flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years, fecal occult blood testing every year combined with flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years, double-contrast barium enema every five to 10 years or colonoscopy every 10 years. Screening of persons with risk factors should begin at an earlier age, depending on the family history of colorectal cancer or polyps. These recommendations augment the colorectal cancer screening guidelines of the American Academy of Family physicians. Recent advances in genetic research have made it possible to identify persons at high risk for colorectal cancer because of an inherited predisposition to develop this malignancy. These patients require aggressive screening, usually by lower endoscopy performed at an early age. In some patients, genetic testing can guide screening and may be cost-effective.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

    Source

    American family physician 59:11 1999 Jun pg 3083-92

    MeSH

    Adenomatous Polyposis Coli
    Age Factors
    Algorithms
    Barium Sulfate
    Colitis, Ulcerative
    Colonoscopy
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis
    Contrast Media
    Decision Trees
    Enema
    Humans
    Mass Screening
    Occult Blood
    Population Surveillance
    Risk Factors
    Sigmoidoscopy

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10392591

    Citation

    Read, T E., and I J. Kodner. "Colorectal Cancer: Risk Factors and Recommendations for Early Detection." American Family Physician, vol. 59, no. 11, 1999, pp. 3083-92.
    Read TE, Kodner IJ. Colorectal cancer: risk factors and recommendations for early detection. Am Fam Physician. 1999;59(11):3083-92.
    Read, T. E., & Kodner, I. J. (1999). Colorectal cancer: risk factors and recommendations for early detection. American Family Physician, 59(11), pp. 3083-92.
    Read TE, Kodner IJ. Colorectal Cancer: Risk Factors and Recommendations for Early Detection. Am Fam Physician. 1999;59(11):3083-92. PubMed PMID: 10392591.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Colorectal cancer: risk factors and recommendations for early detection. AU - Read,T E, AU - Kodner,I J, PY - 1999/7/7/pubmed PY - 1999/7/7/medline PY - 1999/7/7/entrez SP - 3083 EP - 92 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 59 IS - 11 N2 - Spurred by mounting evidence that the detection and treatment of early-stage colorectal cancers and adenomatous polyps can reduce mortality, Medicare and some other payors recently authorized reimbursement for colorectal cancer screening in persons at average risk for this malignancy. A collaborative group of experts convened by the U.S. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research has recommended screening for average-risk persons over the age of 50 years using one of the following techniques: fecal occult blood testing each year, flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years, fecal occult blood testing every year combined with flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years, double-contrast barium enema every five to 10 years or colonoscopy every 10 years. Screening of persons with risk factors should begin at an earlier age, depending on the family history of colorectal cancer or polyps. These recommendations augment the colorectal cancer screening guidelines of the American Academy of Family physicians. Recent advances in genetic research have made it possible to identify persons at high risk for colorectal cancer because of an inherited predisposition to develop this malignancy. These patients require aggressive screening, usually by lower endoscopy performed at an early age. In some patients, genetic testing can guide screening and may be cost-effective. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10392591/Colorectal_cancer:_risk_factors_and_recommendations_for_early_detection_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=10392591 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -