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Physical activity, protein intake, and appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Jul; 70(1):91-6.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Aging is associated with physical inactivity, low energy intake, and loss of skeletal muscle mass. It is not clear whether regular physical activity and adequate dietary protein intake can attenuate the loss of skeletal muscle mass.

OBJECTIVE

We hypothesized that the maintenance of physical activity and dietary protein intake would attenuate the age-related decline in total appendicular skeletal muscle mass.

DESIGN

Total appendicular skeletal muscle mass was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 44 healthy, older white men aged 49-85 y. Physical activity level was determined by using a uniaxial accelerometer over a 9-d period. Dietary protein intake was estimated from a 3-d food record.

RESULTS

Aging was inversely associated with total appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men (r = -0.43; slope: -0. 119 +/- 0.039 kg/y; P < 0.01). An effect of age on appendicular skeletal muscle mass persisted after standing height and physical activity were controlled for (r = -0.34; slope: -0.120 +/- 0.052 kg/y; P = 0.03). Furthermore, an effect of age on appendicular skeletal muscle mass persisted after standing height and dietary protein intake per kilogram body mass was controlled for (r = -0.41; slope: -0.127 +/- 0.045 kg/y; P < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Maintaining regular physical activity and adequate protein intake may not offset the age-related loss of appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results and to determine whether anabolic physical activity (eg, strength training) can attenuate the age-related loss of muscle mass in the elderly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Metabolic Research, Department of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10393144

Citation

Starling, R D., et al. "Physical Activity, Protein Intake, and Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass in Older Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 70, no. 1, 1999, pp. 91-6.
Starling RD, Ades PA, Poehlman ET. Physical activity, protein intake, and appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;70(1):91-6.
Starling, R. D., Ades, P. A., & Poehlman, E. T. (1999). Physical activity, protein intake, and appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70(1), 91-6.
Starling RD, Ades PA, Poehlman ET. Physical Activity, Protein Intake, and Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass in Older Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999;70(1):91-6. PubMed PMID: 10393144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity, protein intake, and appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men. AU - Starling,R D, AU - Ades,P A, AU - Poehlman,E T, PY - 1999/7/7/pubmed PY - 1999/7/7/medline PY - 1999/7/7/entrez SP - 91 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 70 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Aging is associated with physical inactivity, low energy intake, and loss of skeletal muscle mass. It is not clear whether regular physical activity and adequate dietary protein intake can attenuate the loss of skeletal muscle mass. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that the maintenance of physical activity and dietary protein intake would attenuate the age-related decline in total appendicular skeletal muscle mass. DESIGN: Total appendicular skeletal muscle mass was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 44 healthy, older white men aged 49-85 y. Physical activity level was determined by using a uniaxial accelerometer over a 9-d period. Dietary protein intake was estimated from a 3-d food record. RESULTS: Aging was inversely associated with total appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men (r = -0.43; slope: -0. 119 +/- 0.039 kg/y; P < 0.01). An effect of age on appendicular skeletal muscle mass persisted after standing height and physical activity were controlled for (r = -0.34; slope: -0.120 +/- 0.052 kg/y; P = 0.03). Furthermore, an effect of age on appendicular skeletal muscle mass persisted after standing height and dietary protein intake per kilogram body mass was controlled for (r = -0.41; slope: -0.127 +/- 0.045 kg/y; P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Maintaining regular physical activity and adequate protein intake may not offset the age-related loss of appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older men. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results and to determine whether anabolic physical activity (eg, strength training) can attenuate the age-related loss of muscle mass in the elderly. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10393144/Physical_activity_protein_intake_and_appendicular_skeletal_muscle_mass_in_older_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/70.1.91 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -